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Abortion Debate Clouds Future of Stem Cell Research

Stem Cell Dilemmas
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Jan. 26, 2000 (Washington) -- Does stem cell research result in the destruction of life, or is it the harbinger of a lifesaving scientific tool? The argument threatens to undermine stem cell studies just at the moment when the promising technology is making rapid gains. Even though the Clinton administration allowed stem cell experiments to proceed under tight guidelines, it's not clear yet how George W. Bush will proceed.

The primitive cells, a kind of biologic putty, are obtained from bone marrow or an embryo and theoretically can be molded into other types of cells, which in turn can be used in treatments for many devastating conditions from heart disease to paralysis. The question for scientists now is, how do they crank the cells up? Diabetes is a prime target, because it's thought that stem cells could be readily converted to cells that produce insulin. Similarly, Parkinson's patients might benefit from stem cells turned into manufacturers of the brain chemical dopamine, which is lacking in these patients.

"We have been told by Bush transition team officials that precipitous action on the stem cell research was unlikely, and so far ... there has been none. ... So we're monitoring, almost on an hour to hour basis," Mary Hendrix, PhD president of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology tells WebMD. The group of 60,000 scientists is pushing hard to hold the line on stem cell studies.

Hendrix says that if any policy review occurs, she hopes to convince the president that stem cell experiments hold great promise and can proceed in an ethical manner.

The president campaigned in support of existing federal policy that prohibits research involving the destruction of an embryo. "You're familiar with the president's position on the issue. If there are any other regulations or any other changes, you'll be notified," Ari Fleischer, White House press secretary, tells WebMD.

An unknown in the equation is how newly confirmed Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson will react. He will supervise the federal research establishment, and even though he opposes abortion, as Wisconsin's governor he praised a University of Wisconsin scientist for his work on stem cells. In 1999, Thompson singled out James Thomson, PhD, for "groundbreaking developments in stem cell research."

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