Skip to content

Allergies Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Conquer Your Allergies

You don't need to suffer if you have allergies. Here's how to lessen the blow.
By
WebMD Feature

Allergies can be irritating and even maddening. But you don't have to suffer. Take charge of your environment! Here are some steps to control the allergens that trigger your reactions.

Pollen, mold, dust mites, and animal dander are common irritants that cause itchy eyes and congestion. To get rid of them, you must make changes inside your home - and take precautions when outdoors.

Recommended Related to Allergies

Indoor Allergy Triggers

You come home after a day away, step into the house, and the symptoms hit: Watery eyes, scratchy throat, congestion. Could it be indoor allergies? Allergies are very common. An estimated 50 million Americans are allergic to everything from dust and dander, to mold and mites. But what about you? How can you be sure you have indoor allergies -- and pinpoint what’s causing them? To help you understand what’s behind your allergy symptoms, WebMD got tips from experts on how to recognize common allergy...

Read the Indoor Allergy Triggers article > >

At Home

  • Keep windows closed and use air conditioning.
  • Clean air filters frequently and air ducts at least once a year.
  • Keep humidity in your house below 50% to prevent mold growth.
  • Install dehumidifiers in basements and other damp areas. Avoid moldy areas: basements, garages, crawl spaces, barns, compost heaps.
  • Keep pets outside. If you must keep pets indoors, do not allow them in bedrooms; bathe them often.
  • Use plastic covers for pillows, mattresses, and box springs. Get rid of overstuffed furniture or down-filled bedding/pillows.
  • Wash bedding in hot water every week.
  • Wear a mask and gloves when cleaning to limit chemical exposure.
  • Install hardwood floors instead of carpeting. Limit number of throw rugs.
  • Avoid dust-collecting window blinds and long drapes. Use window shades instead.
  • Vacuum twice a week.
  • Wash bathroom surfaces and shower curtain with diluted bleach.

Outdoors

  • Check the forecast. Stay indoors on hot, dry, windy days when pollen count is high. If mold is a problem, stay inside during rainy or windy days.
  • Check the time. Between 5 a.m. and 10 a.m., pollen counts are highest.
  • Avoid being around freshly cut grass whenever possible.
  • Avoid yard work! Mowing stirs up grass pollen. Flowers are loaded with pollen; so are many trees. Raking leaves stirs up mold spores. Let someone else to do your yard work, so you can avoid these pesky allergens.
  • Wear a mask. If you must work in the yard, an inexpensive painter's mask will protect you from grass and flower pollen as well as mold.
  • Take a shower. After being outdoors, get rid of allergens that may have collected in your clothes and hair. Take a shower, wash your hair, and change clothes.
  • Use the clothes drier. Don't hang clothes and linens outside to dry. Pollen and molds can easily attach to them.
  • Vacuum your car. Lots of animal dander is shed from your clothes onto your car's interior.
  • Keep car windows closed, and close vents. Use air conditioning.

Reviewed on April 23, 2009

Today on WebMD

man blowing nose
Make these tweaks to your diet, home, and lifestyle.
Allergy capsule
Breathe easier with these products.
 
cat on couch
Live in harmony with your cat or dog.
Woman sneezing with tissue in meadow
Which ones affect you?
 

blowing nose
Article
woman with sore throat
Article
 
lone star tick
Slideshow
Woman blowing nose
Slideshow
 

Send yourself a link to download the app.

Loading ...

Please wait...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Thanks!

Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

cat lying on shelf
Article
Allergy prick test
VIDEO
 
Man sneezing into tissue
Assessment
Woman holding feather duster up to face, twitching
Quiz