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    Natural Allergy Relief: Saline Nasal Sprays

    Many people with allergies look for simple remedies, especially if they don’t get enough relief from the usual medicines and treatments.

    If you have a nasal allergy such as to pollen, a saltwater (saline) nasal spray may be one to consider.

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    How can it help my allergies?

    Some studies show that a saline solution restores moisture to dry nasal passages and sinuses, and curbs inflammation of mucous membranes.

    If you use a Neti pot or a small squirt bottle for saline irrigation regularly, it can help to thin mucus, give you less postnasal drip, and cleanse your nasal passages of bacteria.

    What types can I use?

    You can buy an over-the-counter saline solution or make one at home.

    Most over-the-counter saline nasal sprays are isotonic, which means the solution is the same saline concentration as in your body. Hypertonic versions have a higher concentration of salt than what’s in your body. Both types can help clear mucus.

    Saline sprays also help keep the cilia in your nose healthy. Cilia are small hair-like structures that help humidify air to your lungs, trap bacteria to keep them from entering the cells, and aid your sense of smell. By keeping cilia healthy, saline sprays may help treat rhinitis and sinusitis, studies show.

    When should I use it?

    Over-the-counter saline sprays and rinses can help remove pollen from the nasal lining. People often use them at the end of the day. You can also use these sprays to add moisture if your nose feels dry from winter weather.

    If you use a nasal steroid spray to treat your allergies, doctors suggest you first use a saline spray to cleanse the nose and rid it of thick mucus and debris. Thick mucus can keep the steroid from working as well as possible.

    How do I make a saline solution?

    You can easily make one to wash your nose and sinuses at home. This natural remedy can be used with a bulb syringe, a Neti pot, a plastic squirt bottle, or your cupped hands.

    To make the solution, mix 2 to 3 heaping teaspoons of non-iodized salt (kosher salt with no additives is best) to 1 quart of distilled, sterile, or previously boiled water. Add a teaspoon of baking soda.

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