Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Alzheimer's Disease Health Center

Font Size

Overcoming Caregiver's Guilt

By Mary Jo DiLonardo
WebMD Feature

Caregivers are often pulled in different directions. This can lead to guilt. Maybe you feel you're not doing enough for your loved one. Or that caregiving is taking away time from other members of your family. Or you have feelings of resentment toward the person you're looking after.

And that’s natural.

Recommended Related to Alzheimer's

5 Myths About Alzheimer's Disease

Get the facts about Alzheimer's disease as we clear up five common misunderstandings.

Read the 5 Myths About Alzheimer's Disease article > >

But guilt doesn't get you anywhere. It's important to move past those feelings so you can take care of your loved one -- and yourself.

Feeling guilty is normal

Most people in your situation have felt pretty much the same way.

"This feeling of not ever feeling like you're doing a good enough job with anything you're doing is normal. It's unfortunately just a function of being spread too thin," says clinical psychologist Barry J. Jacobs, author of The Emotional Survival Guide for Caregivers. "People shouldn’t beat themselves up for that. Everyone has to just lower their standards a little bit and do the best they can."

Instead of spending all your time caregiving at the expense of your family, find a balance, Jacobs suggests. A little less time here, a little more time there. Then you're not focusing all your attention in one place or on one person at the expense of someone else.

Get a network of support

It's easy to feel like you're not doing enough if you’re trying to do it all yourself. It’s not going to help you or your loved one if you don’t delegate and get some time for yourself.

"Let it be OK to ask for help," says clinical psychologist Sara Honn Qualls, PhD, director of the Gerontology Center at the University of Colorado in Colorado Springs. Ask for aid with specific tasks, like driving the loved one to a doctor's appointment or bringing a meal. Maybe you have a family member who can help with finances.

You may just need a few hours of time for yourself to decompress.

"People have to learn to pace themselves and replenish themselves," Jacobs says. "When people don’t take care of themselves, they're more likely to burn out.”

Today on WebMD

Remember your finger
When it’s more than just forgetfulness.
senior man with serious expression
Which kinds are treatable?
senior man
Common symptoms to look for.
mri scan of human brain
Can drinking red wine reverse the disease?
eating blueberries
Colored mri of brain
Close up of elderly couple holding hands
mature woman
Woman comforting ailing mother
Senior woman with serious expression