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Alzheimer's Disease Health Center

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Types of Alzheimer's Disease

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Nearly everyone with Alzheimer’s disease has the same symptoms -- memory loss, confusion, trouble with once-familiar tasks, and making decisions. Though the effects of the disease are similar, there are three different types.

  • Early-onset Alzheimer's. This type happens to people who are younger than age 65. Often, they’re in their 40s or 50s when they’re diagnosed with the disease. It’s rare -- less than 10% of all people with Alzheimer's have early-onset. People with Down syndrome have a higher risk for it, since they tend to age faster.

    Scientists have found a few ways in which early-onset Alzheimer’s is different from other types of the disease. People who have it tend to have more of the brain changes that are linked with Alzheimer’s. The early-onset form also appears to be linked with a defect in a specific part of a person’s DNA: chromosome 14.  A form of muscle twitching and spasm, called myoclonus, is also more common in early-onset Alzheimer's.
  • Late-onset Alzheimer's. This is the most common form of the disease, which happens to people age 65 and older. It may or may not run in families. So far, researchers haven’t found a particular gene that causes it. No one knows for sure why some people get it and others don’t.
  • Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). This is a form of Alzheimer's disease that doctors know for certain is linked to genes. In families that are affected, members of at least two generations have had the disease. FAD makes up less than 1% of all cases of Alzheimer's. People who have it start showing signs very early, often in their 40s.

 

Recommended Related to Alzheimer's

Understanding Alzheimer's Disease: the Basics

Alzheimer's is a disease that robs people of their memory. At first, people have a hard time remembering recent events, though they might easily recall things that happened years ago. As time goes on, other symptoms can appear, including: Trouble focusing A hard time doing ordinary activities Feeling confused or frustrated, especially at night Dramatic mood swings -- outbursts of anger, anxiety, and depression Feeling disoriented and getting lost easily Physical problems, such...

Read the Understanding Alzheimer's Disease: the Basics article > >

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neil Lava, MD on July 10, 2014
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