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Alzheimer's Disease and Adult Day Care

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    Once the area centers have been located, call the centers and ask them to mail you information about the center's application process, eligibility requirements, sample menus, and activity calendars.

    Once you have received the information, consider:

    • How long the center has been in operation.
    • Who owns or sponsors the center.
    • Hours of operation.
    • Days of operation.
    • Whether they offer transportation to and from the center.

    Once you have looked over the information, the next step is to schedule a tour of the center for both yourself and the person you are caring for. Observations and questions that can be made or asked include:

    • Is the staff friendly?
    • What is the daily cost?
    • Will insurance cover any services?
    • Ask to see sample menus over a period of several weeks.
    • Is the center clean and free of odor?
    • What is expected of the caregiver?
    • Is there a place to isolate sick persons?
    • What are the credentials of the staff?
    • Is the facility wheelchair accessible?
    • Do volunteers help out?
    • What is the staff-to-client ratio? (Six clients per staff member is a good ratio).
    • May you have a list of references?

    Most states require licenses for adult day-care centers and some even require certification. To find licensed and certified centers in your area and to learn more about adult day care, visit the eldercare.gov web site.

    The cost of adult day care varies from facility to facility. Centers funded by corporations or religious organizations can also be relatively inexpensive. If medical services such as physical or speech therapy are provided, Medicare, Medicaid, or veterans' benefits may cover part of the costs.

     

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by David T. Derrer, MD on February 23, 2014
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