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Alzheimer's Disease Health Center

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Tips for Easier Personal Care With Alzheimer’s

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If your loved one has Alzheimer’s, he might need help taking care of himself every day, including assistance with eating, bathing, shaving, and using the toilet.

It’s best to encourage him to handle these things on his own for as long as he can. But when you need to step in, there are ways to make it easier for both of you.

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10 Tips for Long-Distance Alzheimer’s Disease Caregiving

If your mother has Alzheimer's disease and lives in Phoenix and you're in New York, how do you help take care of her? Angela Heath, director of the Eldercare Locator Hotline of the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging, has compiled 10 strategies to help you cope. This article is adapted from Heath's book, Long-Distance Caregiving: A Survival Guide for Far Away Caregivers. Tip No. 1: Get organized Keep track of important information in a care log. Tip No. 2: Identify an informal...

Read the 10 Tips for Long-Distance Alzheimer’s Disease Caregiving article > >

General Tips

  • Set up a daily routine and stick to it. For example, brush your loved one's teeth after meals. Or always have baths in the mornings or evenings. Choose the most relaxed times of the day for these tasks.
  • Respect her privacy. Close doors and blinds. Cover her with a towel or bathrobe.
  • Encourage her to take on as much of her own care as possible. This will give her a sense of independence and accomplishment.
  • Keep her abilities in mind. Give her enough time to complete each task -- for example, brushing her hair or teeth.
  • Encourage and support her. For example, say, "You did a nice job getting dressed today."
  • Tell her what you’re doing before you do it -- "I'm going to wash your hair now."
  • If she can dress herself, lay out her clothes in the order she should put them on. It’s best to give her clothing that’s easy to put on, with few buttons.

Eating Well

Healthy eating is very important for people with Alzheimer’s, but it can get harder as their symptoms get worse. Here are some ways to make sure your loved one gets a nutritious diet and plenty of fluids, like water or juice.

  • Encourage her to feed herself if she’s able. Serve finger foods that are easier to handle and eat, like chicken nuggets, orange slices, or steamed broccoli.
  • If eating with a plate and fork gets too hard for her, give her a bowl and spoon. You can also try plate guards or silverware with handles.
  • Don't force her to eat. If she’s not interested in food, try to find out why. Treat her like an adult, not a child.
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