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    Alzheimer's Disease and Nursing Home Care

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    When people with Alzheimer’s disease need round-the-clock care, a nursing home may be the best way to make sure they’re safe and healthy.

    This kind of long-term care offers many services that can meet the physical, social, and emotional needs of people who have long-term illnesses and can’t take care of themselves.

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    The decision to move your loved one into a nursing home isn’t an easy one. It helps to have all the information you and your family need about this option so you can know if it’s the right choice.

    What Kind of Care Do Nursing Homes Offer?

    There are two main types:

    • Basic care, such as help with bathing, eating, dressing, and getting around.
    • Skilled care includes the services of health professionals, like a registered nurse, physical therapist, or occupational therapist. They manage health conditions and give medical treatments.

    The services that nursing homes offer vary, but they usually include:

    • Room and board
    • Help with medication
    • Personal care like dressing, bathing, and using the toilet
    • 24-hour emergency care
    • Social and recreational activities

    How Do I Find the Right Nursing Home?

    It takes time to research nursing homes and decide on the one that’s best for your loved one. So you should start looking long before you’ll need to take the step of moving him. Many facilities often have waiting periods, too. Plan ahead so you can make the transition much easier.

    Family and caregivers should talk about what services their loved one needs and how often he needs them. Think about what’s important to you before you start calling different nursing homes.

    Before you schedule visits to the ones you’re interested in, ask about vacancies, admission requirements, the level of care they provide, and if they accept payment with Medicare, Medicaid, or other government-funded health insurance options.

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