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    For Alzheimer's Caregivers, a Much-Needed Break

    Study confirms adult day care provides beneficial time off

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Amy Norton

    HealthDay Reporter

    FRIDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Day care centers for people with Alzheimer's disease can give their spouses and other family caregivers a much needed source of stress relief, a new study suggests.

    Such centers offer people with dementia a chance to socialize and take part in activities that stimulate their minds. The programs can also give spouses, children and other caregivers a break.

    Intuitively, that should ease some of caregivers' daily stress. But there hasn't been much research to prove it.

    In the new study, published recently in the journal Gerontologist, researchers measured stress levels of 173 family caregivers in four U.S. states who used care centers for their relative with dementia.

    Through phone interviews over one week, they found caregivers were less stressed and had fewer bouts of anger on day care days than other days. And when stressors did crop up -- such as problems at work -- they took less of an emotional toll.

    "I think this reinforces the fact that caregivers can't do this all on their own," said Carol Steinberg, president of the Alzheimer's Foundation of America. "People need relief."

    Study author Steven Zarit agreed. "There's a famous book [on caregiving] called 'The 36-Hour Day,' and I think that perfectly describes it," he said. "Caregivers need help. When they get a break, it's a way to restore."

    Allan Vann, whose wife, Clare, has Alzheimer's, said he initially thought he could care for her on his own. A retired principal from Commack, N.Y., Vann said he was used to daily stress, and figured he had the "broad shoulders" that could bear the work of caring for his wife.

    Clare Vann was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 2009 at age 63 -- which is considered early-onset Alzheimer's. It took three years to get that diagnosis, however. Her husband had begun noticing symptoms three years earlier, when she was talking about their two grandchildren -- even though they had four -- and about a trip to France, even though they'd never been there.

    These days, Clare needs help with everyday basics, such as hygiene and dressing. And she also attends adult care services most days of the week.

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