Skip to content

    Alzheimer's Disease Health Center

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Alzheimer's Progression, Step by Step

    As researchers learn more, therapy might someday address brain changes much sooner

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Barbara Bronson Gray

    HealthDay Reporter

    TUESDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- New research seeks to delineate just how Alzheimer's disease unfolds in the human brain.

    Biological changes may happen earlier than scientists had previously thought, according to a new disease model. This suggests that early signs of risk could potentially become treatment targets long before symptoms of Alzheimer's begin to appear, the researchers said.

    "We're getting a better idea of what is happening during the asymptomatic [symptomless] phases of the disease," said Dean Hartley, director of science initiatives at the Alzheimer's Association, who was not involved with the new research.

    The scientists behind the new research identified distinct but overlapping phases in the course of Alzheimer's disease, each detectable by biological "markers" showing physical changes in the brain. They also have refined their model to distinguish between these "biomarkers" of Alzheimer's disease and those of normal aging.

    In the first phase of Alzheimer's, brain markers signaling changes in beta-amyloid protein show up first, the model suggests. Beta-amyloid plaques are protein pieces from the fatty membrane surrounding nerve cells that clump together, contributing to nerve dysfunction.

    In the second phase of the disease, signs of degeneration and death of brain cells occur.

    Symptoms of dementia are seen in the third phase of Alzheimer's disease, according to the new model.

    The refined model should help researchers design better research, guide the selection of study participants, suggest the ideal time to begin treatment and help measure the impact of treatment, said Dr. Clifford Jack Jr.

    Jack is lead author of one of three related studies to be presented Tuesday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference, in Boston. He said his research has been accepted for publication in the journal Neurology.

    In addition to beta-amyloid proteins, "tau" -- another protein -- also plays a role in Alzheimer's, creating what are called "neurofibrillary tangles." Jack said the changes in the brain created by tau seem to occur first, but amyloid aggregation, or clumping, accelerates the changes in tau and causes it to spread.

    The central message is that tau and beta-amyloid plaque interact with each other in a synergistic way, said Jack, a professor of radiology and a neuroradiologist at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, in Rochester, Minn.

    Today on WebMD

    Remember your finger
    When it’s more than just forgetfulness.
    senior man with serious expression
    Which kinds are treatable?
     
    senior man
    Common symptoms to look for.
    mri scan of human brain
    Can drinking red wine reverse the disease?
     
    Checklist
    ARTICLE
    eating blueberries
    ARTICLE
     
    clock
    Article
    Colored mri of brain
    ARTICLE
     
    Human brain graphic
    ARTICLE
    mature woman
    ARTICLE
     
    Woman comforting ailing mother
    ARTICLE
    Senior woman with serious expression
    ARTICLE