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Asthma Health Center

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Treating Asthma: Preventing Damage to the Airways

Asthma can cause permanent damage to your lungs if not treated early and well. Here's why - and what you can do.
WebMD Feature

Is your asthma under control? If you're like most people, you probably think it is. You feel OK most of the time, so you usually don't need medicine. When your asthma flares up, a puff from your trusty emergency inhaler solves the problem -- most of the time, at least.

But experts say that if you have persistent asthma and you're only treating it during attacks, you're not controlling it at all. Anyone who has asthma symptoms more than twice a week during the daytime, or more than two nights a month, should talk to their doctors about preventive treatment.

Recommended Related to Asthma

Could Your Migraines Signal Uncontrolled Asthma?

In the doctor’s office, it’s a familiar combination: a patient with both asthma and migraine. Each disease tends to run in families, but are the two conditions also linked? If so, once a person gains better control of asthma symptoms, might the excruciating headaches ease, too? Headache specialist Roger K. Cady, MD, believes so. “I would certainly say from my clinical practice that controlling either of those will help the other,” he says. Cady, founder of the Headache Care Center in Springfield,...

Read the Could Your Migraines Signal Uncontrolled Asthma? article > >

"A lot of people have this attitude that they don't need to worry about their asthma unless they're having an attack," says Timothy Craig, DO, professor of medicine and pediatrics at Penn State University. "The rest of the time, they ignore it."

Asthma: An Ever-Present Disease

Asthma is a chronic, incurable disease. Even when you feel well, your asthma hasn't gone away. Even if you can't feel it, your airways might still be inflamed. Treating persistent asthma with only occasional puffs from a rescue inhaler is like dealing with a leaky pipe in your basement by mopping up the water on the floor. You're only thinking about the symptom and not treating the underlying cause. Over time, if asthma isn't well controlled it can damage your airways permanently.

Yet while damage to the airways may be irreversible, it is not inevitable. The good news is that there is a lot you can do to prevent serious damage from ever developing.

"When asthma gets correctly diagnosed and treated, most people do very well with the conventional medications we have available," says allergist Jonathan A. Bernstein, MD, associate professor of clinical medicine at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

There may not be a cure for asthma, but by sticking to the right treatment -- avoiding triggers and taking your medicine -- you can regain control and live a full and normal life.

How Asthma Affects Your Airways

Asthma is a complicated disease, and doctors don't completely understand its causes. But it has two main components: inflammation and muscle constriction.

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When Is Your Asthma Worse?

When Is Your Asthma Worse?

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