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Allergic Asthma

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Medications for Allergic Asthma

Taking steps to control allergens is likely to improve your symptoms. But you may still need allergy and asthma medications to treat attacks.

Tray nasal allergymedications that don’t make you sleepy (like over-the-counter generic Claritin), saline rinses, and decongestant nasal sprays (but only for a few days). If these don’t work, use nasal steroid sprays and stronger antihistamines. If none of this helps, it may be time to talk to a doctor about allergy shots.

There are many good asthma treatments, but most require a prescription. These medications include inhaled steroids, which fight inflammation, and bronchodilators, which open up your airways. If traditional treatments don’t help your allergic asthma, Xolair, an injectable medication that reduces IgE levels, may help.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Luqman Seidu, MD on September 19, 2014
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