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Can Labor Be Induced Naturally?

Other Methods to Induce Labor

When it comes to inducing labor, the following methods draw mixed reviews from childbirth experts. Either there's no evidence to support them or they might work but carry risks. If you plan to try any of them, consult your doctor or midwife first.

  • Long walks: Going for a long walk is "good exercise," Harper says, "but I don't think that it helps bring on labor." Stein is more critical. "Short walks are OK, but I'm not a fan of long, tiring walks. Exhaustion is not a good way to go into labor."
  • Spicy foods: It's a popular theory, but there's no direct connection between the stomach and the uterus. So, there's no reason to think a particular type of food will bring on contractions. "I have never seen anything that supports [spicy foods] one way or another," Harper says.
  • Castor oil: Stein sometimes recommends taking a small amount of castor oil after the 38th week. "There's no direct action on the uterus. It's indirect via stimulation of the bowels, which lean on the uterus. This only seems to work when the body is ready to go into labor." But Harper says there's "no good evidence" for inducing labor with castor oil. "Castor oil brings on horrific diarrhea. I don't recommend it, because you could get moms dehydrated."
  • Cohosh: Some women try starting labor with cohosh, but doctors caution that this herb contains plant-based chemicals that may act like estrogen in the body. "I'm actually pretty nervous about it," Harper tells WebMD. "It's not well enough studied."
  • Evening primrose oil: Harper is more positive about another herb, evening primrose oil. It has substances that your body changes into prostaglandins, which soften the cervix and get it ready for labor. "Evening primrose oil does supposedly release prostaglandins," Harper says. "But it needs more study."

Inducing Labor in the Hospital

If you pass your due date, your doctor or midwife may recommend inducing labor in the hospital. For women with high-risk pregnancies, Harper says they are may be induced very close to or just before the due date. For low-risk pregnancies, she says, 42 weeks is "the absolute cut-off."

Inducing labor usually starts with taking prostaglandins as pills or applying them inside the vagina near the cervix. Sometimes this is enough to start contractions.

If that's not enough to induce labor, the next step is Pitocin, a man-made form of the hormone oxytocin. It stimulates uterine contractions. Harper says it's vital that Pitocin only be given once the cervix is open and ready for labor. " Most people recommend starting out with prostaglandins for preparation of the cervix."

The Waiting Game

As the due date approaches, many couples are eager for labor to begin so they can finally meet their little one.

And though that's the most exciting moment of your life, you might want to slow down and not rush through things. Stein recommends saving your energy, rather than wearing yourself out with schemes for starting labor sooner.

In other words, get some sleep while you can!

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WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Nivin Todd, MD, FACOG on May 21, 2012

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