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    Rett Syndrome

    Rett syndrome is a rare, but severe brain disorder that affects girls. It's usually discovered in the first two years of life, and a child's diagnosis with Rett syndrome can feel overwhelming. Although there's no cure, early identification and treatment may help girls and families who are affected by Rett syndrome.

    Rett syndrome was at one time included under the Autism umbrella.  Once a genetic cause for Rett (a mutation) was discovered, it was reclassified it as a neurologic disorder with a known genetic cause. That said, if someone has Rett syndrome as well as autistic symptoms, they are diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder.  

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    Who Gets Rett Syndrome?

    Rett syndrome is a genetic that affects girls almost exclusively. It's rare -- only about one in 10,000 to 15,000 girls will develop the condition.

    In most cases of Rett syndrome, a child develops normally in early life. Between 6 and 18 months of age, though, changes in the normal patterns of mental and social development begin.

    What Are the Symptoms of Rett Syndrome?

    Although it's not always detected, a slowing of head growth is one of the first events in Rett syndrome. Loss of muscle tone is also an initial symptom. Soon, the child loses any purposeful use of her hands. Instead, she habitually wrings or rubs her hands together.

    Around 1 to 4 years of age, social and language skills deteriorate in a girl with Rett syndrome. She stops talking and develops extreme social anxiety and withdrawal or disinterest in other people.

    Rett syndrome also causes problems with muscles and coordination. Walking becomes awkward as girls develop a jerky, stiff-legged gait. A girl with Rett syndrome may also have uncoordinated breathing and seizures.

    What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    Most children with Rett syndrome have a mutation in a particular gene on the X chromosome. Exactly what this gene does, or how its mutation leads to Rett syndrome, isn't clear. It's believed that the single gene may influence many other genes involved in development.

    Although Rett syndrome seems to be genetic, the faulty gene is almost never inherited from the parents. Rather, it's a chance mutation that happens in the girl's own DNA. No Rett syndrome risk factors have been identified, other than being female. There is no known method for preventing Rett syndrome.

    When boys develop the Rett syndrome mutation, they die shortly after birth. Because boys have only one X chromosome (instead of the two girls have), the disease is more serious, and quickly fatal.

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