Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Breast Cancer Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Multivitamins Linked to Breast Cancer Risk

Study Shows Higher Risk of Breast Cancer Among Women Who Report Taking Multivitamins

Designing New Studies

More studies are needed to get to the bottom of the issue, says Gilbert Ross, MD, medical director for the American Council on Science and Health, a New York City-based consumer education group.

The bottom-line? 

"If you really want to take multivitamins, this study is no reason to stop," Ross says. "Of course, on the other hand, I would advise anyone concerned that there is no good health or medical reason to take multivitamin supplements, except in rare cases of malnutrition."

"Focus on looking at food as the source of minerals and nutrients that we need in our lives," says Lorenzo Cohen, PhD, a professor and director of the Integrative Medicine Program at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

"We know that multivitamins and supplements are useful for people who are malnourished or deficient in particular minerals or vitamins, but more is not necessarily better," he says.  "In a society where individuals have a vitamin and minerals at appropriate levels, supplementing with a multivitamin may not decrease your risk of cancer."

1 | 2

Today on WebMD

Breast Cancer Health Check
HEALTH CHECK
breast cancer overview slideshow
SLIDESHOW
 
cancer fighting foods
SLIDESHOW
senior woman
Article
 
Breast Cancer Treatments Improving
VIDEO
Resolved To Quit Smoking
SLIDESHOW
 
Woman getting mammogram
Article
Screening Tests for Women
SLIDESHOW
 
ovarian cancer overview slideshow
SLIDESHOW
serious woman
Article
 
what is your cancer risk
HEALTH CHECK
10 Ways to Revitalize Slideshow
SLIDESHOW