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Rise in Risk With New Breast Cancer Gene: Study

One in three women with PALB2 mutation will develop disease by age 70
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WebMD News from HealthDay

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Mutated versions of a gene called PALB2 can dramatically increase a woman's risk of breast cancer, a new study has found.

Women carrying the PALB2 mutation have a one in three chance of developing breast cancer by the age of 70, British researchers report in the Aug. 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

The risk is even higher for women with a family history of breast cancer, the investigators found.

"If a mutation carrier has a strong family history, the risk would go up to about six in 10 by age 70," said senior study author Marc Tischkowitz, a researcher with the department of medical genetics at the University of Cambridge.

Those odds place PALB2 just behind the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes as a top genetic risk factor for breast cancer, Tischkowitz said.

Women who carry a mutated form of either of the BRCA genes have a 45 percent to 65 percent risk of breast cancer by age 70, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

Researchers first identified the PALB2 gene in 2006, and it was further associated with breast cancer in a study published in 2007, Tischkowitz said.

This new study provides the first solid evidence regarding the breast cancer risk associated with PALB2, said Dr. Roger Greenberg, an associate professor of cancer biology with the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia.

Armed with this knowledge, women with a PALB2 mutation can talk with their doctor about whether they should undergo a mastectomy to reduce their breast cancer risk. Such surgery has been shown to reduce cancer risk by 90 percent, Greenberg noted.

"She can better make that decision based on the likelihood she could get cancer," Greenberg said. "I would frame it as a very relevant question for PALB2 carriers."

Doctors also could recommend more aggressive surveillance for breast cancer, such as annual mammograms or MRI breast screening, Tischkowitz said.

About one in every 1,000 women carry the PALB2 mutation, said study co-author William Foulkes, director of the Program in Cancer Genetics at McGill University's Center for Translational Research in Cancer, located in Montreal.

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