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    Breast Cancer Health Center

    Facts About Breast Cancer

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    Cells in the body normally divide (reproduce) only when new cells are needed. Sometimes, cells in a part of the body grow and divide out of control, which creates a mass of tissue called a tumor. If the cells that are growing out of control are more normal cells, the tumor is called benign (not cancerous). If, however, the cells that are growing out of control are abnormal, don't function like the body's normal cells, and begin to invade other tissue, the tumor is called malignant (cancerous).

    Cancers are typically named after the part of the body from which they originate. Breast cancer originates in the breast tissue. Like other cancers, breast cancer can invade and grow into the tissue surrounding the breast. It can also travel to other parts of the body and form new tumors, a process called metastasis.

    What Causes Breast Cancer?

    We do not know what causes breast cancer, although we do know that certain risk factors may put you at higher risk of developing it. A person's age, genetic factors, personal health history, and diet all contribute to breast cancer risk.

    Who Gets Breast Cancer?

    Breast cancer ranks second as a cause of cancer death in women (after lung cancer). Today, about 1 in 8 women (12%) will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. The American Cancer Society estimated that in 2015, about 231,840 women will be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and about 40,290 will die from the disease.

    Only 5% to 10% of breast cancers occur in women with a clearly defined genetic predisposition for the disease. The majority of breast cancer cases are "sporadic," meaning there is no direct family history of the disease. The risk for developing breast cancer increases as a woman ages.

     

     

    What Are the Symptoms of Breast Cancer?

    The symptoms of breast cancer include:

    • Lump or thickening in or near the breast or in the underarm that persists through the menstrual cycle.
    • A mass or lump, which may feel as small as a pea.
    • A change in the size, shape, or contour of the breast.
    • A blood-stained or clear fluid discharge from the nipple.
    • A change in the feel or appearance of the skin on the breast or nipple (dimpled, puckered, scaly, or inflamed).
    • Redness of the skin on the breast or nipple.
    • A change in shape or position of the nipple
    • An area that is distinctly different from any other area on either breast.
    • A marble-like hardened area under the skin.

     

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