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    Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Breast Cancer

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    NCI's Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool uses a woman's risk factors to estimate her risk for breast cancer during the next five years and up to age 90. This online tool is meant to be used by a health care provider. For more information on breast cancer risk, call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    Breast cancer is sometimes caused by inherited gene mutations (changes).

    The genes in cells carry the hereditary information that is received from a person's parents. Hereditary breast cancer makes up about 5% to 10% of all breast cancer. Some mutated genes related to breast cancer are more common in certain ethnic groups.

    Women who have certain gene mutations, such as a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, have an increased risk of breast cancer. Also, women who have had breast cancer in one breast have an increased risk of developing breast cancer in the other breast. These women also have an increased risk of ovarian cancer, and may have an increased risk of other cancers. Men who have a mutated gene related to breast cancer also have an increased risk of this disease. For more information, see the PDQ summary on Male Breast Cancer Treatment.

    There are tests that can detect (find) mutated genes. These genetic tests are sometimes done for members of families with a high risk of cancer. See the PDQ summary on Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer for more information.

    Signs of breast cancer include a lump or change in the breast.

    These and other signs may be caused by breast cancer or by other conditions. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following:

    • A lump or thickening in or near the breast or in the underarm area.
    • A change in the size or shape of the breast.
    • A dimple or puckering in the skin of the breast.
    • A nipple turned inward into the breast.
    • Fluid, other than breast milk, from the nipple, especially if it's bloody.
    • Scaly, red, or swollen skin on the breast, nipple, or areola (the dark area of skin that is around the nipple).
    • Dimples in the breast that look like the skin of an orange, called peau d'orange.
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