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    Cervical Cancer Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Cervical Cancer

    1. Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage IA Cervical Cancer Treatment

      Equivalent treatment options:Total hysterectomy.[1] If the depth of invasion is less than 3 mm proven by cone biopsy with clear margins [2] and no vascular or lymphatic channel invasion is noted, the frequency of lymph node involvement is sufficiently low that lymph node dissection is not required. Oophorectomy is optional and should be deferred for younger women. Conization. If the depth of invasion is less than 3 mm, no vascular or lymphatic channel invasion is noted, and the margins of the cone are negative, conization alone may be appropriate in patients wishing to preserve fertility.[1]Modified radical hysterectomy. For patients with tumor invasion between 3 mm and 5 mm, radical hysterectomy with pelvic node dissection has been recommended because of a reported risk of lymph node metastasis of as much as 10%.[2] However, a study suggests that the rate of lymph-node involvement in this group of patients may be much lower and questions whether conservative therapy might be

    2. Cervical Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062903-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Endometrial Cancer Treatment

    3. Endometrial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (04 / 23 / 2014)

      The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. General Information About Endometrial CancerRevised text to state that cancer of the endometrium is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the United States, and irregular vaginal bleeding is an early sign and foremost symptom of the highly curable endometrial tumor.Revised text to state that although the collection of cytology specimen is still suggested, a positive result does not upstage the disease. Stage Information for Endometrial CancerAdded text to state that Féderation Internationale de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique stages are further subdivided by the histologic grade of the tumor, for example, stage IC G2.Treatment Option OverviewAdded text to state that the results of a study by the Danish Endometrial Cancer Group also suggest that the absence of radiation does not improve the

    4. Cervical Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062817-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Cervical Cancer Prevention

    5. Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Recurrent Cervical Cancer

      Treatment of recurrent cervical cancer may include the following:Pelvic exenteration followed by radiation therapy combined with chemotherapy.Chemotherapy as palliative therapy to relieve symptoms caused by the cancer and improve quality of life.Clinical trials of new anticancer drugs or drug combinations.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with recurrent cervical cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

    6. Cervical Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

      Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the treatment of uterine sarcoma. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus process in

    7. Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage Information for Cervical Cancer

      Cervical carcinoma has its origins at the squamous-columnar junction whether in the endocervical canal or on the portion of the cervix. The precursor lesion is dysplasia or carcinoma in situ (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN]), which can subsequently become invasive cancer. This process can be quite slow. Longitudinal studies have shown that in untreated patients with in situ cervical cancer, 30% to 70% will develop invasive carcinoma over a period of 10 to 12 years. However, in about 10% of patients, lesions can progress from in situ to invasive in a period of less than 1 year. As it becomes invasive, the tumor breaks through the basement membrane and invades the cervical stroma. Extension of the tumor in the cervix may ultimately manifest as ulceration, exophytic tumor, or extensive infiltration of underlying tissue including bladder or rectum. In addition to local invasion, carcinoma of the cervix can spread via the regional lymphatics or bloodstream.

    8. Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - In Situ Cervical Cancer Treatment

      Consensus guidelines have been issued for managing women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or adenocarcinoma in situ.[1] Properly treated, tumor control of in situ cervical carcinoma should be nearly 100%. Either expert colposcopic-directed biopsy or cone biopsy is required to exclude invasive disease before therapy is undertaken. A correlation between cytology and colposcopic-directed biopsy is also necessary before local ablative therapy is done. Even so, unrecognized invasive disease treated with inadequate ablative therapy may be the most common cause of failure.[2] Failure to identify the disease, lack of correlation between the Pap smear and colposcopic findings, adenocarcinoma in situ, or extension of disease into the endocervical canal makes a laser, loop, or cold-knife conization mandatory. The choice of treatment will also depend on several patient factors including age, desire to preserve fertility, and medical condition. Most importantly, the extent of disease must

    9. Cervical Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

      Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about endometrial cancer screening. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus process

    10. Uterine Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - General Information About Uterine Sarcoma

      Other PDQ summaries containing information related to uterine sarcoma.

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