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Not all drugs that treat cancer cause hair loss, but many of them do. The good news is that it’s almost always temporary. Here are 12 things you can do while you wait for your locks to grow back.

Get informed. Not all drugs will affect your hair the same way. Some only cause gradual hair thinning. Others may cause your hair to fall out in clumps. Make hair loss less scary by asking your doctor what exactly will happen.

Prepare your family. Depending on their age, children may be scared or even embarrassed by your hair loss. Let them know what to expect and why your treatment is so important. The more positive you can be, the better they’ll react.

Go easy on your hair. To slow down hair loss, stay away from shampoos that contain strong fragrances, alcohol, or salicylic acid. For now, don’t color, perm, or chemically straighten your hair. Don’t use rollers, curling irons, or straightening irons. Use a soft-bristle hairbrush, and instead of using a blow dryer, let your hair air-dry.

Try a shorter style. Shorter hair doesn’t lay flat against your head, so it can make your hair look thicker and fuller. (It’s also easier to manage under wigs.) If you choose to shave your head, use an electric shaver or have it done at a barbershop. Plastic razors can cut your scalp.

Take care of your skin. As you lose your hair, your scalp may get tender or itchy. Some people even feel a tingling sensation. A moisturizing shampoo and conditioner can help, as will a gentle lotion you massage into your scalp.

Rest easy. Wearing a soft cap or turban around your head at night can help collect loose hair as it falls out. Don’t braid your hair or put it into a ponytail, since both can tug on it. A silk pillowcase will also reduce friction when you’re asleep.

Cover up. A scarf or hat when you go outside will shield you from the cold. If you choose not to wear one, don’t forget to apply sunscreen to your scalp to protect against sunburn.

Concerned About Infections During Strong Chemotherapy?

Is Your Immune System Ready for Chemotherapy?


Neulasta® is a prescription medicine used to help reduce the chance of infection due to a low white blood cell count, in people with certain types of cancer (non‐myeloid), who receive anti‐cancer medicines (chemotherapy) that can cause fever and low blood cell count.

It is not known if Neulasta® is safe and effective in children.

Important Safety Information
Who should not take Neulasta®?
Do not take Neulasta® if you have had a serious allergic reaction to Neulasta® (pegfilgrastim) or NEUPOGEN® (filgrastim).

What should I tell my health care provider before taking Neulasta®? Tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • Have sickle cell trait or sickle cell disease
  • Have had severe skin reactions to acrylic adhesives
  • Are allergic to latex
  • Have problems with your kidneys
  • Have any other medical problems
  • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Neulasta® may harm your unborn baby.
  • Are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Neulasta® passes into your breast milk.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over‐the‐counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

What are possible serious side effects of Neulasta®?

  • Spleen Rupture. Your spleen may become enlarged and can rupture while taking Neulasta®. A ruptured spleen can cause death. Call your doctor right away if you have pain in the left upper stomach area or left shoulder tip area. This pain could mean your spleen is enlarged or ruptured.
  • A serious lung problem called Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Call your healthcare provider or get emergency medical help right away if you get any of these symptoms of ARDS: fever, shortness of breath, trouble breathing, or a fast rate of breathing.
  • Serious Allergic Reactions. Get emergency medical help right away if you get any of these symptoms of a serious allergic reaction with Neulasta®: shortness of breath, wheezing, dizziness, swelling around the mouth or eyes, fast pulse, sweating, and hives.

If you have an allergic reaction during the delivery of Neulasta®, remove the On-body Injector for Neulasta® by grabbing the edge of the adhesive pad and peeling off the On-body Injector. Get emergency medical help right away.

  • Sickle Cell Crises. Severe sickle cell crises, and sometimes death, can happen in people with sickle cell trait or disease who receive filgrastim, a medicine similar to Neulasta®.
  • Kidney injury (glomerulonephritis). Kidney injury has been seen in patients who received Neulasta®. You should notify your healthcare provider right away if you experience puffiness in your face or ankles, blood in your urine or brown colored urine or you notice you urinate less than usual.
  • Increased white blood cell count (leukocytosis). Your doctor will check your blood during treatment with Neulasta®.
  • Capillary Leak Syndrome. Neulasta® can cause fluid to leak from blood vessels into your body's tissues. This condition is called "Capillary Leak Syndrome" (CLS). CLS can quickly cause you to have symptoms that may become life-threatening. Get emergency medical help right away if you develop any of the following symptoms:
    • swelling or puffiness and are urinating less often
    • trouble breathing
    • swelling of your stomach-area (abdomen) and feeling of fullness
    • dizziness or feeling faint
    • a general feeling of tiredness

The most common side effect of Neulasta® is pain in the bones and in your arms and legs.

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of Neulasta®. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit, or call 1‐800‐FDA‐1088 (1-800-332-1088).

For more information about Neulasta®, talk with your healthcare provider or pharmacist; go to, or call 1-844-696-3852 (1-844-MYNEULASTA).

Please see accompanying Neulasta® Patient Information.