Skip to content

    Leukemia & Lymphoma

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a cancer that affects your blood cells and bone marrow -- the soft part inside your bones where blood cells are made.

    You may also hear your doctor call it chronic myeloid leukemia. It's the same disease, just a different name.

    Recommended Related to Cancer

    What is prevention?

    Cancer prevention is action taken to lower the chance of getting cancer. By preventing cancer, the number of new cases of cancer in a group or population is lowered. Hopefully, this will lower the number of deaths caused by cancer. To prevent new cancers from starting, scientists look at risk factors and protective factors. Anything that increases your chance of developing cancer is called a cancer risk factor; anything that decreases your chance of developing cancer is called a cancer protective...

    Read the What is prevention? article > >

    With treatment, you may go into what's called "remission."  For most people, that doesn't mean the cancer is completely gone, but it's less active than before. You can be in remission for many years.

    CML usually happens when you're middle-aged or older. The symptoms tend to come on gradually. Many of them can also be signs of other illnesses. For instance, you might feel tired, lose weight when you're not trying to, or sometimes get a fever.

    The disease starts with a problem in the genes of your blood cells. Sections of two different chromosomes switch places and make a new abnormal one.

    This new chromosome leads your body to make white blood cells that don't work as they should.  They're called leukemia cells, and when they show up in your bloodstream, there's less room for healthy blood cells.

    Causes

    Most people will never know what caused them to get CML.  You don't typically get it from your parents or from infections. Your smoking habits and diet don't seem to raise your chance of getting it either.

    The only known risk is if you've been in contact with high levels of radiation.

    1 | 2 | 3 | 4

    Today on WebMD

    stem cells
    What are they and why do we need them?
    Lung cancer xray
    See it in pictures, plus read the facts.
     
    sauteed cherry tomatoes
    Fight cancer one plate at a time.
    Ovarian cancer illustration
    Do you know the symptoms?
     
    Vitamin D
    SLIDESHOW
    New Treatments For Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma
    FEATURE
     
    Lifestyle Tips for Depression Slideshow
    SLIDESHOW
    Pets Improve Your Health
    SLIDESHOW