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    Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Important
    It is possible that the main title of the report Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

    Synonyms

    Disorder Subdivisions

    • None

    General Discussion

    Summary
    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) accounts of about 20% of all leukemias affecting adults. It typically affects middle-aged individuals and rarely adolescents or children. CML is a slowly progressing blood and bone marrow disorder, characterized by the excessive development of white blood cells in the spongy tissue found inside large bones of the body (bone marrow), spleen, liver and blood. As the disease progresses, the leukemic (blast) cells invade other areas of the body including the intestinal tract, kidneys, lungs, gonads and lymph nodes. These diseased cells do not grow old and eventually die like normal cells. They build up in huge numbers, overwhelm healthy blood cells and damage the bone marrow.

    Since CML progresses slowly, many people are first diagnosed during routine blood exams before they even show symptoms. There is no cure for CML because it is not possible to eliminate all of the diseased cells in the body, however, there are many approved treatments that can achieve a long-term remission. Patients respond best to treatment when CML is in its earliest stage, so it is important to diagnose the disease as early as possible. Possible symptoms that may indicate CML are fever, night sweats, fatigue, pain below the ribs on the left side, and inexplicable weight loss. If an individual is experiencing any of the above symptoms or other signs, it is important they make an appointment with their doctor to be tested for CML.

    Introduction
    There are three phases of chronic myelogenous leukemia. The first phase, or the chronic phase, is characterized by a slow, progressive overproduction of white blood cells. In chronic CML, fewer than 10% of the cells in the blood and bone marrow are blast (leukemic) cells. Patients in this phase have the best response to treatment. The next phase is transitional, and is called the accelerated phase, which occurs when 10%-19% of the cells are blast cells. The most advanced phase is the blastic phase. At this point, over 20% of the blood cells are blast cells). In the blastic phase, the leukemia is very aggressive and does not respond well to therapy. Approximately 85% of all individuals with chronic myelogenous leukemia enter this phase.

    Resources

    Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
    1311 Mamaroneck Avenue
    Suite 310
    White Plains, NY 10605
    Tel: (914)949-5213
    Fax: (914)949-6691
    Tel: (800)955-4572
    Email: infocenter@LLS.org
    Internet: http://www.LLS.org

    American Cancer Society, Inc.
    250 Williams NW St
    Ste 6000
    Atlanta, GA 30303
    USA
    Tel: (404)320-3333
    Tel: (800)227-2345
    TDD: (866)228-4327
    Internet: http://www.cancer.org

    National Cancer Institute
    6116 Executive Blvd Suite 300
    Bethesda, MD 20892-8322
    USA
    Tel: (301)435-3848
    Tel: (800)422-6237
    TDD: (800)332-8615
    Email: cancergovstaff@mail.nih.gov
    Internet: http://www.cancer.gov

    Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research
    Froedtert and the Medical College of Wisconsin Clinical Cancer Center
    9200 W. Wisconsin Avenue
    Milwaukee, WI 53226
    Tel: (414)805-0700
    Fax: (414)805-0714
    Email: contactus@cibmtr.org
    Internet: http://www.cibmtr.org/

    OncoLink: The University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center Resource
    3400 Spruce Street
    2 Donner
    Philadelphia, PA 19104-4283
    USA
    Tel: (215)349-8895
    Fax: (215)349-5445
    Email: hampshire@uphs.upenn.edu
    Internet: http://www.oncolink.upenn.edu

    Children's Leukemia Research Association
    585 Stewart Avenue, Suite 18
    Garden City, NY 11530
    Tel: (516)222-1944
    Fax: (516)222-0457
    Email: info@childrensleukemia.org
    Internet: http://www.childrensleukemia.org

    Cancer Research UK
    Angel Building
    407 St John Street
    London, EC1V 4AD
    United Kingdom
    Tel: 020 7242 0200
    Fax: 02071216700
    Email: cancerhelpuk@cancer.org.uk
    Internet: http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/cancer-help/

    Rare Cancer Alliance
    1649 North Pacana Way
    Green Valley, AZ 85614
    USA
    Internet: http://www.rare-cancer.org

    Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
    PO Box 8126
    Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
    Tel: (301)251-4925
    Fax: (301)251-4911
    Tel: (888)205-2311
    TDD: (888)205-3223
    Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/

    CMPD Education Foundation
    P.O. Box 4758
    Scottsdale, AZ 85261
    Email: ian.sweet@homemail.com.au
    Internet: http://www.mpdinfo.org/CMPD_foundation.html

    Friends of Cancer Research
    1800 M Street NW
    Suite 1050 South
    Washington, DC 22202
    Tel: (202)944-6700
    Email: info@focr.org
    Internet: http://www.focr.org

    Cancer Support Community
    1050 17th St NW Suite 500
    Washington, DC 20036
    Tel: (202)659-9709
    Fax: (202)974-7999
    Tel: (888)793-9355
    Internet: http://www.cancersupportcommunity.org/

    Lance Armstrong Foundation
    2201 E. Sixth Street
    Austin, TX 78702
    Tel: (512)236-8820
    Fax: (512)236-8482
    Tel: (877)236-8820
    Email: media@livestrong.org
    Internet: http://www.livestrong.org

    Myeloproliferative Disease Support and Daily Email Digest
    2011 Flagler Ave.
    Key West, FL 33040
    USA
    Tel: (305)295-4444
    Email: roberttollen@gmail.com
    Internet: http://www.mpdsupport.org/

    For a Complete Report:

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

    The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

    It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

    This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

    For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

    Last Updated: 11/5/2012
    Copyright 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2006, 2012 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

    WebMD Medical Reference from the National Organization for Rare Disorders

    Last Updated: May 28, 2015
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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