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Pancreatic Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Pancreatic Cancer

  1. Treatment Options by Stage

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Stages I and II Pancreatic CancerTreatment of stage I and stage II pancreatic cancer may include the following:Surgery.Surgery followed by chemotherapy.Surgery followed by chemoradiation.A clinical trial of combination chemotherapy.A clinical trial of chemotherapy and targeted therapy, with or without chemoradiation.A clinical trial of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy before surgery.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage I pancreatic cancer and stage II pancreatic cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about

  2. Cellular Classification of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    Table 1. Endocrine Tumors of the PancreasIslet CellsSecreted Active AgentTumor and SyndromeACTH = adrenocorticotropin; MSH = melanocyte-stimulating hormone; VIP = vasoactive intestinal peptide; WDHA = watery diarrhea, hypokalemia, and achlorhydria; 5-HT = serotonin.AlphaGlucagonGlucagonoma (diabetes, dermatitis)BetaInsulinInsulinoma (hypoglycemia)DeltaSomatostatinSomatostatinoma (mild diabetes); diarrhea/steatorrhea; gallstonesDGastrinGastrinoma (peptic ulcer disease)A -> DVIP and/or other undefined mediatorsWDHA5-HTACTHMSHCarcinoidCushing syndromeHyperpigmentationInteracinar CellsSecreted Active AgentTumor and SyndromeFPancreatic polypeptideMultiple hormonal syndromesEC5-HTCarcinoid

  3. Changes to This Summary (08 / 08 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Editorial changes were made to this summary.

  4. About This PDQ Summary

    Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the treatment of pancreatic cancer. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus process in

  5. Stages of Pancreatic Cancer

    Tests and procedures to stage pancreatic cancer are usually done at the same time as diagnosis. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the pancreas or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage of the disease in order to plan treatment. The results of some of the tests used to diagnose pancreatic cancer are often also used to stage the disease. See the General Information section for more information.There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body.The three ways that cancer spreads in the body are:Through tissue. Cancer invades the surrounding normal tissue.Through the lymph system. Cancer invades the lymph system and travels through the lymph vessels to other places in the body.Through the blood. Cancer invades the veins and capillaries and travels through the blood to other places in the body.When cancer cells break away from the primary

  6. Stage Information for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    Note: The American Joint Committee on Cancer has published the 7th edition of the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual, which for the first time incorporates pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in the same staging system as pancreatic exocrine tumors.[1] The classification of these tumors as benign versus malignant is not always consistent, so the AJCC recommends that all pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors be staged using this system and reported to cancer registries. It also recommends that the protocol developed by the College of American Pathologists for endocrine pancreatic tumors be used to examine and stage specimens.[2]Definitions of TNMThe American Joint Committee on Cancer has designated staging by TNM classification to define pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (islet cell tumors).[1]Table 2. Primary Tumor (T)aa Reprinted with permission from AJCC: Exocrine and endocrine pancreas. In: Edge SB, Byrd DR, Compton CC, et al., eds.: AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. 7th ed. New York, NY: Springer,

  7. General Information About Pancreatic Cancer

    Related Summary Note: Another PDQ summary containing information related to pancreatic cancer includes: Unusual Cancers of Childhood (pancreatic cancer in children) Statistics Note: Estimated new cases and deaths from pancreatic cancer in the United States in 2010:[ 1 ] New cases: 43,140. Deaths: 36,800. Note: Some citations in the text of this section are followed by a level of evidence. The ...

  8. nci_ncicdr0000062951-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

  9. General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    Tumors of the endocrine pancreas are a collection of tumor cell types collectively referred to as pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). These tumors originate in islet cells. Although they may be similar or identical in histologic appearance to carcinoid tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, differences in their underlying biology and likely differences in response to therapeutic agents suggest that they should be treated and investigated as a distinct entity.[1] They are uncommon cancers with about 1,000 new cases per year in the United States.[2] They account for 3% to 5% of pancreatic malignancies and overall have a better prognosis than the more common pancreatic exocrine tumors.[2,3] Five-year survival is about 55% when the tumors are localized and resected but only about 15% when the tumors are not resectable.[3] Overall 5-year survival rate is about 42%.[2]Figure 1. Cancer of the Pancreas: Relative Survival Rates (%) by Histologic Subtype, Ages 20+, 12 SEER Areas,

  10. General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors form in hormone-making cells (islet cells) of the pancreas.The pancreas is a gland about 6 inches long that is shaped like a thin pear lying on its side. The wider end of the pancreas is called the head, the middle section is called the body, and the narrow end is called the tail. The pancreas lies behind the stomach and in front of the spine. Anatomy of the pancreas. The pancreas has three areas: head, body, and tail. It is found in the abdomen near the stomach, intestines, and other organs. There are two kinds of cells in the pancreas:Endocrine pancreas cells make several kinds of hormones (chemicals that control the actions of certain cells or organs in the body), such as insulin to control blood sugar. They cluster together in many small groups (islets) throughout the pancreas. Endocrine pancreas cells are also called islet cells or islets of Langerhans. Exocrine pancreas cells make enzymes that are released into the small intestine to help the

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