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Children's Health

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Focus on Health, Not Fat, in Food Talks With Kids

Teens whose parents harped about weight gain tended to have more unhealthy eating behaviors, study shows

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Denise Mann

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- There's a right way and a wrong way to persuade your adolescent to eat healthy and help avoid obesity, a new study suggests.

Pointedly connecting food with fatness or talking about needed weight loss is the wrong way and could even encourage unhealthy eating habits, researchers report.

Instead, discussions that focus on simply eating healthfully are less likely to send kids down this road, a new study shows.

"A lot of parents are aware of the obesity problem in the U.S -- it's everywhere you turn -- but they wonder how to talk about it with their children," said study lead author Dr. Jerica Berge of the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis.

She advises that parents "tell kids to eat more fruits and vegetables because eating them will make them healthy and strong. Don't connect these conversations to weight and size."

The study is published online June 24 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Childhood obesity has more than tripled in adolescents in the United States over the past 30 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This has had a profound effect on children's health, with condition formerly only seen in adults, such as type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, now being diagnosed in children.

The new study included survey data from more than 2,300 adolescents with an average age of about 14 and more than 3,500 parents.

Overall, the data showed, conversations about eating that focused on a child's supposed need to lose excess weight were linked to a higher risk of problem dieting and other unhealthy eating behaviors among adolescents.

On the other hand, parents who talked about healthy eating and living but did not focus on weight and size were less likely to have children who dieted or engaged in other unhealthy eating behaviors such as anorexia, binge eating or bulimia.

These benefits were seen in both overweight and normal weight teens, the study showed.

Overall, about 28 percent of moms and 23 percent of dads of kids who were not overweight said they had conversations that focused on healthy eating, while only 15 percent of moms and 14 percent of dads who had overweight children said they talked about health.

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