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    Noonan Syndrome

    Important
    It is possible that the main title of the report Noonan Syndrome is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

    Synonyms

    • NS
    • female pseudo-Turner syndrome
    • male Turner syndrome
    • Turner phenotype with normal chromosomes (karyotype)

    Disorder Subdivisions

    • None

    General Discussion

    Noonan syndrome is a common genetic disorder that is typically evident at birth (congenital). The disorder is characterized by a wide spectrum of symptoms and physical features that vary greatly in range and severity. In many affected individuals, associated abnormalities include a distinctive facial appearance; a broad or webbed neck; a low posterior hairline; a typical chest deformity and short stature. Characteristic abnormalities of the head and facial (craniofacial) area may include widely set eyes (ocular hypertelorism); skin folds that may cover the eyes' inner corners (epicanthal folds); drooping of the upper eyelids (ptosis); a small jaw (micrognathia); a depressed nasal root; a short nose with broad base; and low-set, posteriorly rotated ears (pinnae). Distinctive skeletal malformations are also typically present, such as abnormalities of the breastbone (sternum), curvature of the spine (kyphosis and/or scoliosis), and outward deviation of the elbows (cubitus valgus). Many infants with Noonan syndrome also have heart (cardiac) defects, such as obstruction of proper blood flow from the lower right chamber of the heart to the lungs (pulmonary valvular stenosis) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Additional abnormalities may include malformations of certain blood and lymph vessels, blood clotting and platelet deficiencies, learning difficulties or mild intellectual disability, failure of the testes to descend into the scrotum (cryptorchidism) by the first year of life in affected males, and/or other symptoms and findings.

    Noonan syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by abnormalities (mutations) in four main genes: PTPN11 (50%), SOS1 (13%), RAF1 (3-17%), KRAS (less than 5%), with a handful of individuals having a mutation in NRAS, BRAF or MEK2. Noonan-like disorders are found in association with mutations in SHOC2 and CBL.

    Resources

    Human Growth Foundation
    997 Glen Cove Avenue
    Suite 5
    Glen Head, NY 11545
    Tel: (516)671-4041
    Fax: (516)671-4055
    Tel: (800)451-6434
    Email: hgf1@hgfound.org
    Internet: http://www.hgfound.org/

    MAGIC Foundation
    6645 W. North Avenue
    Oak Park, IL 60302
    Tel: (708)383-0808
    Fax: (708)383-0899
    Tel: (800)362-4423
    Email: mary@magicfoundation.org
    Internet: http://www.magicfoundation.org

    March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation
    1275 Mamaroneck Avenue
    White Plains, NY 10605
    Tel: (914)997-4488
    Fax: (914)997-4763
    Tel: (888)663-4637
    Email: Askus@marchofdimes.com
    Internet: http://www.marchofdimes.com

    The Arc
    1825 K Street NW, Suite 1200
    Washington, DC 20006
    Tel: (202)534-3700
    Fax: (202)534-3731
    Tel: (800)433-5255
    TDD: (817)277-0553
    Email: info@thearc.org
    Internet: http://www.thearc.org

    American Heart Association
    7272 Greenville Avenue
    Dallas, TX 75231
    Tel: (214)784-7212
    Fax: (214)784-1307
    Tel: (800)242-8721
    Email: Review.personal.info@heart.org
    Internet: http://www.heart.org

    Restricted Growth Association
    PO Box 5137
    Yeovil, BA20 9FF
    United Kingdom
    Tel: 03001111970
    Fax: 03001112454
    Email: office@restrictedgrowth.co.uk
    Internet: http://www.restrictedgrowth.co.uk

    NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
    P.O. Box 30105
    Bethesda, MD 20892-0105
    Tel: (301)592-8573
    Fax: (301)251-1223
    Email: nhlbiinfo@rover.nhlbi.nih.gov
    Internet: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/

    Noonan Syndrome Support Group, Inc.
    P.O. Box 145
    Upperco, MD 21155
    Tel: (410)374-5245
    Tel: (888)686-2224
    Email: info@noonansyndrome.org
    Internet: http://www.noonansyndrome.org

    Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation
    PO Box 547
    Tenafly, NJ 07670
    USA
    Tel: (866)808-2873
    Fax: (201)227-7016
    Email: info@childrenscardiomyopathy.org
    Internet: http://www.childrenscardiomyopathy.org

    Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
    PO Box 8126
    Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
    Tel: (301)251-4925
    Fax: (301)251-4911
    Tel: (888)205-2311
    TDD: (888)205-3223
    Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/

    Madisons Foundation
    PO Box 241956
    Los Angeles, CA 90024
    Tel: (310)264-0826
    Fax: (310)264-4766
    Email: getinfo@madisonsfoundation.org
    Internet: http://www.madisonsfoundation.org

    For a Complete Report:

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

    The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

    It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

    This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

    For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

    Last Updated: 9/24/2012
    Copyright 1987, 1990, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2009, 2011, 2012 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

    WebMD Medical Reference from the National Organization for Rare Disorders

    Last Updated: May 28, 2015
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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