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Growth and Development, Ages 2 to 5 Years - When to Call a Doctor

Although your child grows at his or her own pace, be aware of signs of a developmental delay. The earlier you identify a delay, the better chance you have of getting the right treatment for your child that can prevent or minimize long-term problems.

In general, talk to a doctor anytime your child:

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  • Does not seem to be reaching developmental milestones as expected.
  • Is not growing at a steady pace. Each year between ages 2 and 5 years, expect your child to gain about 3 lb (1.5 kg) to 5 lb (2.5 kg) and grow as much as 3 in. (7.6 cm). Although your child's height and weight are measured at routine well-child exams, call your doctor if your child's growth pattern concerns you in between these visits.
  • Is not able to do some of the things he or she used to do, such as talking or running.
  • Makes you so angry or frustrated that you are worried about what you might do next.
  • Acts overly aggressive, violent, or verbally abusive.
  • Does not seem to be doing well, even though you can't pinpoint what makes you uneasy. Friends and other caregivers may also be concerned.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: October 18, 2013
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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