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Immunizations - When to Call a Doctor

Call 911 or other emergency services if you or your child develops any of the following symptoms:

  • An allergic reaction, such as difficulty breathing, wheezing, hives, hoarseness, paleness, weakness, a fast heart rate, or dizziness.
  • Behavior changes, such as passing out (losing consciousness), acting confused, being very sleepy or hard to wake up, or not responding to being touched or talked to.
  • A seizure.

Call your doctor if:

Recommended Related to Children's Vaccines

Preteen and Teen Immunizations

With all the issues that come with raising an adolescent, it can be easy for parents to lose track of recommended preteen and teen immunization boosters. Fortunately, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (AICP) has recently updated its recommendations and immunization schedule for children 0-18 years old. The most current recommendations for preteen and teen immunizations include: Tetanus and diphtheria toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) Tdap vaccine is usually administered...

Read the Preteen and Teen Immunizations article > >

  • Redness and swelling at the site of the shot (injection) last longer than 48 hours.
  • Your child is 3 months of age or younger and has a fever of 100.4 °F (38 °C) or higher.
  • A fever lasts longer than 48 hours after receiving a shot.
  • Any unusual reaction occurs.

If a fever develops after an immunization and you need to find out if you should call your doctor, see:

Talk with your doctor about whether you need special immunizations because you:

  • Are in close contact with people who have an infectious disease.
  • Have planned international travel, especially to developing countries.
  • Live with or visit a pregnant woman or baby.
  • Live with someone who has an impaired immune system.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: March 12, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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