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Ear Infection Health Center

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Ear Problems and Injuries, Age 11 and Younger - Topic Overview

otola_01.jpg

Ear pain in children may be a sign of an infection in the space behind the eardrum (middle ear camera.gif). Ear infections (otitis media) most commonly occur when cold symptoms, such as a runny or stuffy nose and a cough, have been present for a few days.

An ear infection may occur when the eustachian tube swells and closes and fluid accumulates in the middle ear. The combination of fluid and germs (from bacteria or viruses) creates a perfect environment for an infection. Swelling from the infection can cause pain from increased pressure on the eardrum. The pressure can cause the eardrum to rupture (perforate). A single eardrum rupture is not serious and does not cause hearing loss. Repeated ruptures may lead to hearing loss.

Middle ear infections are more common in children than in adults. Young children have short, soft, more horizontal eustachian tubes camera.gif that are more easily blocked than those of older children and adults.

Ear infection is the most commonly diagnosed bacterial infection in children younger than age 7. Almost all children will have at least one ear infection by the time they are 7 years old. Most ear infections occur in babies between the ages of 6 months to 3 years. After age 7, ear problems may be related to inflammation, infection, or fluid buildup in the middle or external ear. Ear infections are more common in boys than in girls, and they most often occur in children who:

Fluid often remains in the middle ear (serous otitis, or middle ear effusion) after an ear infection. This may cause no symptoms, or it may cause a muffling of sound, decreased hearing, and mild discomfort. The body usually reabsorbs fluid behind the eardrum within 3 months, and hearing returns to normal. Recurrent ear infections and persistent effusion may occur in some children.

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