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    How to Stop a Cold

    By Andrea Billups
    WebMD Feature
    Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson, MD

    One day you’re fine. The next you have a scratchy throat, watery eyes, and a runny nose. There’s a tickle in the back of your throat, and your normal high energy is nowhere to be found.

    Yes, these are early signs that you’re coming down with something. But don’t grab your tissue box and hop into bed just yet -- there are ways to nip that cold in the bud.

    Rest and Cut Your Stress

    There’s a deep "mind-body" link at play when it comes to fighting off a cold, Estores says. If you feel tired, overworked, sad, or angry, those emotions can sink your mood. That can slow your immune system just when you need it running at full power to fight the cold virus.

    Listen to your body when you feel a cold coming on. Get all the sleep you can. Get a handle on your stress -- it can quickly send a cold into high gear. "When you’re stressed out, you’re more likely to get a cold," Estores says.

    Usually when you feel a cold coming on, your immune system jumps in and fights the virus. But too much stress cuts the number of cells that make up the front lines of defense. Stress also pumps up the level of cortisol in your body. This hormone zaps your immune system, and that makes you a prime target for a cold.

    To give your immune system a charge, do something that relaxes you: Listen to music, meditate, or do a light workout. And don’t forget to rest, Estores says. Your body needs that, too.

    Drink Up

    It’s no fun to have to blow your nose or walk around with a head full of thick gunk. If this sounds like you, fluids are your friend. They’ll help unclog your nose and thin any mucus so you can cough or blow it out, says Jean Carstensen, MD, who teaches medicine and pediatrics at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

    Keep a full glass close by. Any fluid -- besides alcohol -- will count toward keeping you hydrated. But plain water is best, Carstensen says.

    If you feel feverish, it’s time to give your elbow a workout. A fever drains even more body fluids through sweat or through your lungs (as you breathe) than you would normally, Carstensen says.

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