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Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR) - Topic Overview

How is it treated?

Many children do not need treatment for vesicoureteral reflux. The ureters grow as a child gets older. Mild cases of VUR usually go away completely by the time a child is 5 years old.

If treatment is needed, antibiotics, such as amoxicillin or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (for example, Bactrim), are often prescribed. Antibiotics prevent or treat infection and help reduce the chance of scarring that can lead to kidney damage. Your child may need to take continuous antibiotic treatment. Or your doctor may give you the option of carefully watching your child for signs of another urinary tract infection and only using antibiotics when he or she gets a new infection. Frequent tests may be needed to check for bacteria in the urine.

Surgery may be needed to repair more severe cases of VUR. A surgeon may need to create new valves for the ureters to prevent the backflow of urine.

Surgery may also be needed if your child has repeated urinary tract infections while taking antibiotics or is not able to take antibiotics.

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WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: February 27, 2013
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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