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Deep Vein Thrombosis Health Center

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Treatment for Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)

What will treating DVT, a blood clot deep in a vein, do for you?

  • It will prevent the clot from growing.
  • It'll keep the clot from breaking off and traveling to your lung or another organ.
  • You'll avoid long-lasting complications, such as leg pain and swelling.
  • Treatment prevents future blood clots, too.

Often, medication and taking care of yourself will do the trick. But you may need surgery. Talk to your doctor about which medical treatment options are right for you.

Recommended Related to DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis)

What You Can Do About DVT

After you find out you have deep vein thrombosis, or a blood clot in your vein, you'll want to avoid dangerous complications and stop more clots from forming.

Read the What You Can Do About DVT article > >

Blood Thinners

These drugs, also called anticoagulants, are the most common treatment for DVT. They can keep a clot from growing or breaking off, and they prevent new clots from forming. But they can't thin your blood, despite their name, or dissolve an existing clot.

Blood thinners include:

In the hospital, your doctor may give you heparin at first, by a needle into your vein or as a shot. You may have to keep taking shots at home, once or twice daily. When you take heparin by IV, you'll need blood tests, too. But you won't need them when you're taking shots of low-molecular-weight heparin under your skin.

You may take warfarin (Coumadin) by pill once a day, starting while you're still on heparin, and then usually for 3 to 6 months or more. While you take it, you'll need regular blood tests to make sure you've got the right amount in your system -- too little won't prevent clots, too much makes dangerous bleeding more likely. It can also interact with other medicines, vitamins, and foods with a lot of vitamin K, which is another good reason to get your blood checked often.

Let your doctor know if you're pregnant, because warfarin can cause birth defects. You'll have to take something else.

Newer anti-clotting medicines, known as Xa inhibitors, work as well as warfarin for most people. You won't have to get blood tests, change your dose, or remember what foods you ate. These drugs may cause less bleeding than warfarin, but there's no medicine you can take to stop bleeding if it becomes a problem.

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