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Epilepsy Health Center

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Stopping Your Epilepsy Treatment

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Can You Stop Taking Your Epilepsy Drugs?

If you have epilepsy and haven't had a seizure in a long time, you may wonder if you can stop taking your epilepsy drugs. Your doctor may tell you that you can stop your medication if you haven't had a seizure in two years. Other doctors advise their patients to wait until four or five years have passed without a seizure before stopping their epilepsy treatment.

Some people can stop taking their epilepsy medication, but it depends on their age and the type of epilepsy. More than half of children who stop having seizures while on medication can eventually stop taking the medication without suffering new seizures. In a study of adult epilepsy patients, 68% of those who had not had a seizure in two years could stop taking their medication without having another seizure; 75% could discontinue if they had gone three years without a seizure.

Recommended Related to Epilepsy

Understanding Epilepsy -- the Basics

Epilepsy is a brain disorder characterized by recurrent seizures -- episodes of abnormal electrical activity in almost any part of the brain. The symptoms of a seizure can mimic different types of human behavior, depending on which part of the brain is affected. Generally, the term epilepsy (or seizure disorder) refers to relatively stereotyped attacks of involuntary behavior. The exact symptoms and severity may vary, and the seizures may occur infrequently or in rapid succession. While every...

Read the Understanding Epilepsy -- the Basics article > >

It's very important to keep taking your medication as long as the doctor prescribes it. If you stop taking it suddenly, you have a greater chance of having new seizures. These seizures can be extremely dangerous and may make it more difficult to treat future occurrences.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Richard Senelick, MD on July 15, 2014
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