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Epilepsy Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Epilepsy

  1. Epilepsy - Prevention

    Since the cause of epilepsy is often not clear, it is not possible to prevent it.Head injury, a common cause of epilepsy, may be preventable. Always wear your seat belt in the car and a helmet when riding a bike or motorcycle, skiing, skating, or horsebac

  2. Stopping Medicine for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    It is easy to understand people's reasons for wanting to stop medicine. Some reasons are side effects and drug toxicity,the cost and inconvenience of medicine,and,for women who want to have children,the higher risk of birth defects associated with some epilepsy medicines. If you have not had a seizure in several years,you may want to discuss with your doctor the possibility of stopping ...

  3. Questions About Medicines for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    While working with your doctor to plan a medicine routine for yourself or your child,it may help you to talk about some of the choices and issues involved. Some of the following questions might help you prepare. How often will I or my child have to take the medicine? Some medicines for epilepsy have to be taken several times a day. This is sometimes hard for children in school; people with ...

  4. Epilepsy: Tonic Seizures - Topic Overview

    Tonic seizures are fairly uncommon. They occur mostly in people with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This is a severe form of generalized epilepsy that begins in early childhood. (Children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome may also have atonic seizures.)When a tonic seizure occurs, the muscles in the body contract and the entire body stiffens. This occurs suddenly and without warning. And it often causes the person to fall down.People who have tonic or atonic seizures are likely to be injured when they fall. Children may have to wear helmets and restrict their activities to prevent serious injury.

  5. Epilepsy: Myoclonic Seizures - Topic Overview

    Myoclonic seizures affect a small number of children and adults with generalized epilepsy of unknown cause (idiopathic). In children and teens with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, the seizures seem to occur most often after waking up or while falling asleep.During a myoclonic seizure:The arms, legs, torso, or facial muscles jerk rapidly as though they are being shocked.The body may jerk once or many times, on one or both sides of the body, in a rhythmic or random pattern.The person usually does not lose consciousness.Myoclonic seizures are almost always very brief.

  6. Epilepsy - Home Treatment

    Controlling seizures caused by epilepsy requires a daily commitment to following your treatment plan. If you are using antiepileptic medication, you must take your medication exactly as prescribed. Not following the treatment plan is one of the main reaso

  7. Hemispherectomy for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    The left and right sides of the brain are called hemispheres. Hemispherectomy is the removal of one side of the brain. This procedure is sometimes done on children who have severe forms of epilepsy, such as Rasmussen syndrome and Sturge-Weber disease. These conditions badly damage one side of the brain, cause frequent seizures and problems with physical and mental development. And these conditions do not respond well to drug treatment.Hemispherectomy may completely prevent seizures and reverse delays in development that occur with some forms of epilepsy.The surgery always causes some loss of movement and sensation on one side of the body and sometimes causes partial loss of vision in half of the visual field of each eye. But most children with a large epileptic area on one side of the brain already have these problems before the surgery.

  8. Epilepsy - Other Treatment

    For many years, antiepileptic medication was the only treatment for people with epilepsy. This is still true for many people, although surgery is now an option for some.

  9. Epilepsy - Cause

    Learn about causes of epilepsy, including tumor, infection, or damage to the brain.

  10. Diagnosing Epilepsy: EEG's Limits - Topic Overview

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is thought to be the most useful test in confirming a diagnosis of epilepsy, but it is not foolproof. Some people with abnormal EEG results do not have epilepsy. This is not common.About 50% of people with epilepsy will have normal results on their first EEG.1 If epilepsy is still suspected, a follow-up EEG may be done. This second test may be a sleep-deprived EEG, in which the test is done after you have been forced to stay awake for a longer period of time than usual. A sleep-deprived EEG can sometimes reveal abnormalities that did not show up on the regular EEG.From 10% to 40% of people with epilepsy will have normal EEG results even after having several EEG tests done.1Video and EEG monitoring records seizures on videotape and computer so that the doctor can see what happens just before, during, and right after a seizure occurs. The video records what you are doing while the EEG records the electrical activity occurring in your brain. This type of

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