Skip to content

Eye Health Center

Font Size

Ocular Hypertension

Medical Treatment continued...

How your ophthalmologist chooses to treat you is highly individualized. Depending on your particular situation, you may be treated with medications or just observed. Your doctor will discuss the pros and cons of medical treatment versus observation with you.

  • Some ophthalmologists treat all elevated intraocular pressures of higher than 21 mm Hg with topical medicines. Some do not medically treat unless there is evidence of optic nerve damage. Most ophthalmologists treat if pressures are consistently higher than 28-30 mm Hg because of the high risk of optic nerve damage.

  • If you are experiencing symptoms like halos, blurred vision, or pain, or if your intraocular pressure has recently increased and then continues to increase on subsequent visits, your ophthalmologist will most likely start medical treatment.

Your intraocular pressure is evaluated periodically. One guideline to how often your intraocular pressure is checked is shown below.
 

  • If your intraocular pressure is 28 mm Hg or higher, you are treated with medicines. After 1 month of taking the drug, you have a follow-up visit with your ophthalmologist to see if the medicine is lowering the pressure and there are no side effects. If the drug is working, then follow-up visits are scheduled every 3-4 months.
  • If your intraocular pressure is 26-27 mm Hg, the pressure is rechecked in 2-3 weeks after your initial visit. On your second visit, if the pressure is still within 3 mm Hg of the reading at the initial visit, then follow-up visits are scheduled every 3-4 months. If the pressure is lower on your second visit, then the length of time between follow-up visits is longer and is determined by your ophthalmologist. At least once a year, visual field testing is done and your optic nerve is examined.
  • If your intraocular pressure is 22-25 mm Hg, the pressure is rechecked in 2-3 months. At the second visit, if the pressure is still within 3 mm Hg of the reading at the initial visit, then your next visit is in 6 months and includes visual field testing and an optic nerve examination. Testing is repeated at least yearly.

Follow-up visits may also be scheduled for the following reasons:

  • If a visual field defect shows up during a visual field test, repeat (possibly multiple) examinations are performed during future office visits. An ophthalmologist closely monitors a visual field defect because it may be a sign of early primary open-angle glaucoma. That is why it is important for you to do your best when taking the visual field test, as it may determine whether or not you have to start on medications to lower your eye pressure. If you get tired during a visual field test, make sure to tell the technician to pause the test so you can rest. That way, a more accurate visual field test can be obtained.
  • A gonioscopy is performed at least once every 1-2 years if your intraocular pressure significantly increases or if you are being treated with miotics (a type of glaucoma medication).
  • More fundus photographs (which are pictures of the back of the eye) are taken if the optic nerve/optic disk changes in appearance.

 

Today on WebMD

Woman holding tissue to reddened eye
Learn about causes, symptoms, and treatments.
eye
Simple annoyance or the sign of a problem?
 
red eyes
Symptoms, triggers, and treatments.
blue eye with contact lens
Tips for wearing and caring.
 
Understanding Stye
Article
human eye
Article
 
eye
Video
eye exam timing
Video
 
vision test
Tool
is vision correction surgery for you
Article
 
high tech contacts
Article
eye drop
Article
 

Special Sections