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Chemical Pinkeye (Conjunctivitis) - Topic Overview

Chemical pinkeye (conjunctivitis) or toxic pinkeye is caused by getting smoke, liquids, fumes, or chemicals in the eye. Flushing the eye with running water must be done immediately to remove the toxic chemical or liquid.

Mild pinkeye can be caused by the chlorine in swimming pools. Most people don't need treatment. After the eye is rinsed free of the toxic substance, artificial tears or ointment may be used to decrease the redness and irritation.

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Symptoms of serious pinkeye caused by a toxic substance include:

  • Severe pain.
  • Decreased vision.
  • Redness.
  • Large amounts of swelling.

Pinkeye from a chemical or toxic substance needs to be evaluated by a doctor.

Chemical pinkeye is not contagious.

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WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: November 02, 2011
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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