Skip to content

Quiz: How Much Do You Know About Alternative Fibromyalgia Treatments?

  1 of  
Current Score:  
Loading..Please Wait
slide image

What percentage of people with fibromyalgia use some form of complementary or alternative treatment?

slide image

What percentage of people with fibromyalgia use some form of complementary or alternative treatment?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

According to the National Institutes of Health, about 90% of people with fibromyalgia use some form of complementary or alternative medicine – the diverse group of practices and products that are beyond conventional medicine. Although research is mixed on the effectiveness of many of these practices, the National Fibromyalgia Association says alternative treatments can "play an important role in [fibromyalgia] treatment." The group urges patients to consult a medical professional to "establish a multifaceted and individualized approach that works for them."

slide image

Scientific studies suggest people with fibromyalgia may benefit from:

slide image

Scientific studies suggest people with fibromyalgia may benefit from:

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Exercise is an important complement to conventional medical treatment of fibromyalgia. Exercise "has been found to improve outcomes for people with fibromyalgia," according to the CDC.

 

Guaifenesin – an over-the-counter expectorant drug -- and medical marijuana have attracted attention as potential treatments, but both also have attracted skeptics -- and neither has undergone rigorous scientific study.

Which of the following is often a symptom of fibromyalgia?

Which of the following is often a symptom of fibromyalgia?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Because people with fibromyalgia often have trouble sleeping, they sometimes turn to supplements that have a reputation for helping people sleep. Among these, melatonin has drawn perhaps the most attention; preliminary results found it not only improves sleep patterns, it actually might help fibromyalgia pain.

 

Other sleep-aid supplements include lavender, chamomile, valerian, hops, and skullcap. However, research is mixed on their effectiveness for insomnia, and there's no evidence that any work for fibromyalgia.

 

Always consult your doctor before starting a dietary supplement. Some supplements may interact with medications.

The cause of fibromyalgia is:

The cause of fibromyalgia is:

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

It’s not known what causes fibromyalgia. The main symptom is widespread pain, particularly at certain "pressure points" or "tender points" on the neck, shoulders, back, hips, arms, and legs. Other symptoms include fatigue, headaches, irritable bowel, sleep disturbances, and tingling in the hands and feet.

 

Because fibromyalgia symptoms overlap with symptoms of many other disorders, it can be difficult to diagnose. Many patients turn to complementary and alternative medicine for relief because it's a chronic condition -- and still something of a mystery to conventional medicine.

According to the National Institutes of Health, research shows "modest, preliminary support" for the effectiveness of which of the following in treating fibromyalgia.

According to the National Institutes of Health, research shows "modest, preliminary support" for the effectiveness of which of the following in treating fibromyalgia.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Massage therapy shows promise for fibromyalgia. At least two studies have reported a benefit, but others have found only fleeting benefit or no improvement.

 

According to the NIH, "research evidence is insufficient to draw conclusions" about the effectiveness of hypnosis, biofeedback, or chiropractic care.

Traditional pain relievers are always effective for the pain of fibromyalgia.

Traditional pain relievers are always effective for the pain of fibromyalgia.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

A major reason patients often turn to complementary and alternative treatments is the spotty effectiveness of traditional pain relievers for fibromyalgia pain.

 

However, traditional painkillers do work sometimes and they continue to be an important option for people with the condition. Over-the-counter painkillers such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, and naproxen can sometimes be effective, especially for muscle aches.

Which of the following is an accepted conventional treatment for fibromyalgia?

Which of the following is an accepted conventional treatment for fibromyalgia?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Because there is no magic bullet for fibromyalgia, the main goal of treatment is to make the patient feel better. Consequently, conventional therapies for fibromyalgia and its symptoms are wide-ranging. Medicines include antidepressant and anticonvulsant medications, pain relievers, and muscle relaxants.

 

Physical therapy is considered helpful to build strength and improve range of motion. Psychological support is often recommended to help patients learn to cope with what can be a very painful and frustrating condition.

Which of the following dietary supplements has been proven to help treat symptoms of fibromyalgia?

Which of the following dietary supplements has been proven to help treat symptoms of fibromyalgia?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Many dietary supplements used by fibromyalgia patients -- including echinacea, cayenne, milk thistle, black cohosh, lavender, and B vitamins -- are unproven. Always consult with your doctor before beginning to take a dietary supplement, because some supplements may interact with medications or be unsafe to take.

Which of the following diets can help reduce symptoms of fibromyalgia?

Which of the following diets can help reduce symptoms of fibromyalgia?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

No specific diet or type of diet has been shown to have an effect on fibromyalgia. However, it's important for fibromyalgia patients, as well as for everyone else, to eat a healthy, balanced diet.

Which of the following supplements has shown "some evidence of a benefit" -- according to the NIH -- for treating symptoms of fibromyalgia?

Which of the following supplements has shown "some evidence of a benefit" -- according to the NIH -- for treating symptoms of fibromyalgia?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

The NIH's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine reports that although studies on the amino acid derivative SAMe (S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine) have had mixed results, "there is some evidence of a benefit" for fibromyalgia -- but "more research is needed."

 

Although some fibromyalgia and arthritis patients take MSM (methyl-sulfonyl-methane) for joint pain and others use St. John's Wort for depression, there's no solid evidence either supplement works for fibromyalgia.

Which of the following has been proven to bring pain relief to people with fibromyalgia?

Which of the following has been proven to bring pain relief to people with fibromyalgia?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Recent research found the ancient Chinese martial art of tai chi had benefits for musculoskeletal pain, depression, and quality of life in fibromyalgia patients. It's unclear why it might work -- and more study is needed -- but tai chi is sometimes called "moving meditation" -- and meditation is thought to bring health benefits through stress reduction and physical relaxation.

 

Although the NIH calls acupuncture “a promising alternative" for some pain conditions, it has shown mixed results for fibromyalgia. And the NIH says "there is no convincing scientific evidence to support claims that magnets can relieve pain of any type."

Some researchers believe that low levels of the following may contribute to fibromyalgia:

Some researchers believe that low levels of the following may contribute to fibromyalgia:

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

The cause of fibromyalgia is unknown. Some researchers believe that reduced levels of magnesium may contribute to the condition. According to the NIH, though, "there is no conclusive scientific evidence that magnesium supplements can help relieve fibromyalgia symptoms."

Your Score:     You correctly answered   out of   questions.
Your Score:     You correctly answered   out of   questions.
results image

Good job! You know a lot about alternative fibromyalgia treatments.

Not bad, but you can improve. Read up on alternative treatments and try the quiz again.

Not so good. Read up on fibromyalgia treatments and try the quiz again.

Today on WebMD

instructor training woman with dumbbells
Can it help your fibromyalgia flare-ups?
woman painting
It’s hard, but we’ve got tips.
 
woman at desk rubbing shoulder
Tips to modify your workspace is one step.
Woman rubbing her upper back
Get treatment options and coping skills.
 
Fatigue or Something More
Slideshow
Woman with stressed, fatigue
Article
 
woman in pain
Article
69x75_thumbnail_woman_applying_pressure_to_forehea
Article
 
woman eating apple
Article
Sex Advice for Single Women
Article
 
Your Symptoms
Article
Uncomfortable mature woman
Article