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Want to fight fatigue? Here's what kind of exercise -- and how much -- is best.

There you are, sitting on the couch, remote in hand, thinking, "I should be exercising. If only I weren't too tired to get off the couch!" Indeed, fatigue is among the most common complaints doctors hear. But you might be surprised to learn that experts say one of the best antidotes to beating fatigue and boosting energy is to exercisemore, not less.

"It's now been shown in many studies that once you actually start moving around -- even just getting up off the couch and walking around the room -- the more you will want to move, and, ultimately, the more energy you will feel," says Robert E. Thayer, PhD, a psychology professor at California State University, Long Beach, and author of the book Calm Energy: How People Regulate Mood With Food.

And, experts say, when it comes to fighting fatigue, not all exercise is created equal. Read on to find out what kind of exercise -- and how much -- you should be doing for optimum energy-boosting results.

Just How Does Exercise Boost Energy?

In a study published in the journal Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics in 2008, University of Georgia researchers found that inactive folks who normally complained of fatigue could increase energy by 20% while decreasing fatigue by as much as 65% by simply participating in regular, low-intensity exercise.

Further, Thayer says, a study he plans to present at an American Psychological Association meeting reveals that on days when people walked more total daily steps, they ended the day with more energy then on days when they walked less.

How exactly does this happen?

"Contrary to popular belief, exercising doesn't make you tired -- it literally creates energy in your body. Your body rises up to meet the challenge for more energy by becoming stronger," says nutritionist Samantha Heller, MS, RD, a nutrition advisor for the Journey for Control diabetes program.

Heller says this happens on the cellular level, where the first stirrings of our natural energy production begin. "It all begins with tiny organs called mitochondria. Located in our cells, they work like tiny power plants to produce energy," she says.

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