Skip to content

Fitness & Exercise

Font Size

How to Stop Runners' Cramps

How to treat -and avoid cramps that strike when you run or jog.
By
WebMD Feature

You're running, and all of a sudden, you get a side stitch or cramp, a stomach cramp, or your leg muscle clenches.

It happens to a lot of runners. But you can learn to minimize cramps while running, and to act quickly when they do strike.

What Causes Cramps While Running?

The origin of a cramp depends on the type.

  • Side cramp or ''stitch": This cramp strikes you in the side, as the name implies, or even in the lower abdominal area. It's mainly the result of shallow breathing, not breathing deeply from the lower lung, says Jeff Galloway, a 1972 Olympian. He's a veteran runner who has trained more than 200,000 runners and walkers and runs a marathon-training program. ''The side pain is a little alarm" alerting you about your breathing, Galloway says. An imbalance of blood electrolytes (such as calcium, potassium, and sodium) in your body may also contribute, says Pete McCall, an exercise physiologist and fitness instructor with Function First in San Diego.
  • Stomach cramps: Again this could be related to how you're breathing,  Galloway says. Or it could be something you ate or drank before your workout.  "If you have put too much fluid or food in your stomach, you can't get a large breath," Galloway says. If your levels of sodium, potassium, and calcium are off-kilter, that could contribute to stomach cramps, too, McCall says.

  • Muscle cramps: When your leg muscles cramp up on you, dehydration is often to blame, McCall says.

 

How to Prevent Cramps While Running

To avoid side cramps, Galloway suggests deep lung breathing. His advice: Put your hand on your stomach and breathe deeply. If you're breathing from your lower lungs, your stomach should rise and fall.

Side cramps affect beginners more than longtimers, Galloway notes. "Veteran runners shift [naturally] to lower lung breathing," he says.

To avoid side pain, don't start your run jackrabbit fast. Many side stitches are simply a result of that. "It's always better during the first 10 minutes to be more gentle," Galloway says.

Nervousness can play a role, too. When nerves hit, "you have a tendency to breathe more rapidly, or some do," Galloway says. "When that happens, a lot of people revert to shallow breathing," which can bring on a side cramp.

Healthy Living Tools

Ditch Those Inches

Set goals, tally calorie intake, track workouts and more, all via WebMD’s free Food & Fitness Planner.

Get Started

Today on WebMD

pilates instructor
15 moves that get results.
woman stretching before exercise
How and when to do it.
 
couple working out
Moves you can do at home.
woman exercising
Strengthen your core with these moves.
 
man exercising
Article
7 most effective exercises
Interactive
 
Man looking at watch before workout
Slideshow
Overweight man sitting on park bench
Video
 

Pollen counts, treatment tips, and more.

It's nothing to sneeze at.

Loading ...

Sending your email...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Thanks!

Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

pilates instructor
Slideshow
jogger running among flowering plants
Video
 
woman walking
Article
Taylor Lautner
Article