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Shake Weight: Fitness Expert's Review

Cons continued...

Also, you cannot add additional weight to the device and it offers limited exercises. A muscle improves when it is continually challenged with increased resistance and targeted with a variety of exercises. Therefore, very little (if any) results should be expected with the Shake Weight.

The company claims that the Shake Weight for women will result in lean muscle, which implies fat loss, while it claims that men will experience an increase in muscle mass. However, the workout program of only 6 minutes is not enough exercise to actually burn a significant amount of fat, nor is there enough weight to increase muscle mass.

In addition, the Dynamic Inertia concept may sound unique and complex, but it is neither. “Dynamic” and “inertia” are two terms used to describe movement. Based on this concept, all forms of resistance training involve dynamic inertia.

As a matter of fact, you will get a greater amount of movement with traditional weight training, in which you can target your muscles through a full range of motion. The shaking motion of the device is unnatural and may cause muscle spasms that could lead to injury. 

The company also claims that the Shake Weight has been validated by a well-documented scientific study from a prestigious university. However, the actual study is not published in any peer-reviewed scientific journal. A reference to the study cannot be found on the Shake Weight web site, in any advertisement, or with the product package. An attempt to search for the specific study online also yielded no results.

Bottom Line

Save your money and do not buy this exercise device. You can probably get the same type of workout by using a regular 5-lb. dumbbell and shaking it back and forth.

Of course, that would not be recommended as an effective way to work your muscles very well, either. The best way to sculpt your arms, tone your upper body, and decrease body fat is to perform a well-designed workout routine that offers a variety of aerobic and traditional resistance training exercises.

The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommends at least 2-3 days per week of total-body resistance exercise for most people who want to increase or maintain muscular fitness. The ACSM also recommends a minimum of 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity on most days of the week to improve overall health.

Although it may be better than doing no exercise at all, the Shake Weight does not come close to meeting the published and well-respected scientifically based exercise guidelines.

(Michael R. Esco, PhD, CSCS, HFS, is an assistant professor in the department of physical education and exercise science at Auburn University Montgomery in Montgomery, Ala. His opinions and conclusions are his own.)

 

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Edited on February 01, 2011

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