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Staging Your Personal Tour de France

You may feel like the most inactive person in the world, but it is possible to achieve your own Tour de France victory.
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Your heart races, breath shallow from excitement, and sweat moistens your back. The road ahead looks ominously mountainous. Could a bicycle make it up that high? You don't doubt it for a second. Without a thought to the danger of falling, you go full steam ahead -- with your cheers -- along with other spectators of the Tour de France.

Throughout the three-week competition, millions of viewers follow elite cyclists through some 2,100 miles of French terrain. People root for their favorite contender and stand in awe of these amazing athletes. And for good reason.

"This is the athlete cream of the crop for bike racing in the world today," says Bob Roll, author of The Tour de France Companion. He should know. He was a member of the first American team to participate in the legendary race.

Roll likens the challenges of the Tour to the trials of everyday life. "The bike racer can slog up the mountains, plunge down the valleys, win, lose, crash, and the guy that gets to the finish in Paris, he's the guy that gets up and recovers from the setbacks."

Cyclist Lance Armstrong is a popular example of someone with an indomitable spirit. After he was diagnosed with testicular cancer that spread to his lungs and brain and was given a very low chance to live, he not only survived the disease, but he went on to win five consecutive Tours. A seventh victory would make him the only contender to ever to achieve such a feat.

Tour contestants have three times the lung capacity and half the resting heart rate. The typical Tour de France contestant reaches a maximum heart rate of above 200 beats per minute on a regular basis, compared to almost never for any other segment of the population, says Roll.

Don't worry if you feel sluggish next to these guys. Mother Nature handed them their remarkable physiology. They were genetically predisposed to have narrow shoulders, large legs, and relatively skinny arms -- the ideal profile of a competitive racer.

Since the Tour's first run in 1903, there have only been 20 to 25 Americans who have ever qualified for the event, says Roll.

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