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Tea, coffee, chocolate, avocados, and fatty fish all have good-for-you qualities.

We all know that spinach and carrots are good for us, but would you believe that such seeming indulgences as tea, coffee, chocolate, avocados, and fatty fish also have properties that prevent disease and enhance your health?

It's true. Some of these five "superfoods" contain antioxidants, which are thought to fight the damage from disease-causing "free radicals" (unstable molecules that damage cells). Others have omega-3 fatty acids, which promote heart health and may even help to cheer you up when you're down in the dumps.

Here's a rundown on how these five foods can benefit your health.


Topping the list of surprising superfoods is tea -- any type that comes from the leaves of the plant Camellia sinensis, including black, green, white, and oolong.

Many studies have looked at the health benefits of tea. While the jury is still out on some of these potential benefits, there appears to be compelling evidence for tea's ability to reduce the risk of heart disease.

"There are some intriguing studies that tea may prevent cancer, reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease, and impact halitosis [bad breath], and while these studies are more speculative, the strongest evidence is on the reduction of coronary heart disease risk," says Tufts University researcher Jeffrey Blumberg, PhD.

Tea's secret ingredient is catechins, a type of flavonoid from the family of disease-fighting antioxidant phytochemicals that is also found in fruits, vegetables, and red wine.

Not just any cup of tea will provide you with a healthy dose of flavonoids. Strong, steeped tea is richest in these phytochemicals. And the longer you steep your tea, the more of these healthy extracts your beverage will contain.

Because iced tea is typically diluted, it's not as good a source as hot tea. Bottled teas start off with low levels of flavonoids, and tend to lose potency over time. Decaffeinated tea is a good option, though it has about 10% fewer phytochemicals than tea with caffeine.

So how much tea should you drink? Some studies have suggested that drinking three cups each day can reduce your risk of heart disease.

Blumberg suggests choosing tea whenever you can. He points out that it can contribute as much antioxidants as a serving of fruit or vegetable without the calories, and is far preferable to soft drinks.

If you add sugar or full-fat milk to your tea, do so sparingly. These additions can turn naturally noncaloric tea into a high-calorie beverage.

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