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3 Ways to Cook Eggs

Spice up your egg routine with these clever recipes.
By Erin O'Donnell
And Kathleen M. Zelman, MPH, RD, LD
WebMD Magazine - Feature

Is the egg a super-food or a dietary devil? New research may help unscramble the answer. A recent analysis of egg studies found that healthy people who included eggs in their diets showed no increased risk of heart disease or stroke.

Eggs do have cholesterol (186 milligrams apiece), but that's not a problem for most of us. "For heart health, there are bigger fish to fry in terms of food," says Meridan Zerner, RD, LD, dietitian at the Cooper Clinic in Dallas.

Saturated fat and trans fat appear to have a bigger effect on blood cholesterol levels and heart disease risk, she says, and one egg offers just 1.5 grams of saturated fat and zero trans fat.

Eggs already stand out as a low-calorie source of protein (6 grams per egg). They may prevent you from overeating and keep blood sugar levels steady, Zerner says. Plus, eggs are one of the top sources of choline, a B vitamin that protects the heart and aids fetal brain development (making eggs a good choice for pregnant women). Egg yolks also contain lutein and zeaxanthin, antioxidants that appear to protect against age-related eye diseases.

Still, many experts recommend you limit yourself to an egg a day. If you have heart disease or diabetes, you may need to limit that amount further. It's best to think of eggs as just one option in your rotation of healthy foods, Zerner says. "We find health in the middle ground."

Eggcellent Salad Sandwich

This lunchtime favorite gets a healthy makeover with the help of light mayo and nonfat Greek yogurt.

Makes 4 servings

 

Ingredients

Dressing:

2 tbsp light mayonnaise

2 tbsp nonfat plain Greek yogurt

½ tsp Dijon mustard

1 tsp fresh lemon juice

¼ tsp grated lemon rind

freshly ground pepper

Salad and Fixings:

6 large hard-cooked eggs, peeled and chopped

1 large celery stalk, minced

1 small red pepper, minced

1 tbsp chopped fresh parsley

8 slices whole grain bread, toasted

1 cup fresh arugula or baby spinach

1 small red onion, sliced

 

Directions

1. Place dressing ingredients in a medium bowl and mix until thoroughly combined.

2. Add to the dressing: eggs, celery, red pepper, and parsley. Toss gently.

3. Cover and refrigerate egg salad for 30 minutes to blend flavors.

4. Make the sandwiches: Place equal amounts of egg salad on four slices
of toast. Garnish with greens and red onion,
and top with remaining toast. Slice each sandwich in half and serve.

 

Per serving: 314 calories, 19 g protein, 33 g carbohydrate, 12 g fat (3 g saturated fat), 294 mg cholesterol, 6 g fiber, 7 g sugar, 386 mg sodium. Calories from fat: 34%.

Huevos Enchiladas

Eggs get the Southwestern treatment in these warming enchiladas. Serve them as a healthy brunch entrée or a tasty light supper.

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