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Worst Foods in Your Fridge

10 unhealthy foods that are probably lurking in your refrigerator or freezer right now.

7. Gourmet Ice Cream continued...

Even sticking to the modest 1/2-cup serving size suggested on the container can send your daily totals of saturated fat, total fat, and calories into overload. 

A serving of Ben & Jerry's Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough, for example, has 270 calories, 14 grams of fat, 8 grams of saturated fat, 65 milligrams of cholesterol, and 25 grams of sugar. One-half cup of Haagen-Dazs White Chocolate Raspberry Truffle will give you 310 calories, 18 grams of fat, 10 grams of saturated fat, 105 milligrams of cholesterol, and 28 grams of sugar. And a more typical serving for most people is one cup, which doubles the totals for fat, calories, cholesterol, and sugar.

Instead, try some of the great-tasting lower-fat, lower-sugar, and lower-calorie ice cream options you can find in any supermarket. The light version of Safeway brand Mint Chocolate Chip, for example, has 120 calories, 4.5 grams of fat, 3.5 grams of saturated fat, and 14 grams of sugar for a 1/2-cup serving. For an even healthier dessert, enjoy some fresh fruit with plain or nonfat Greek yogurt.

8. Creamy Salad Dressing

How many bottles of creamy salad dressing are sitting in your refrigerator? The standard refrigerator fare includes ranch, Thousand Island, and blue cheese.

Each two-tablespoon serving of these traditional creamy dressings adds about 120 calories, 12 grams of fat, 2.5 grams saturated fat, and 380 milligrams of sodium to your salad. Here's the worst part though: most people drizzle on double this amount of dressing (1/4 cup).

So aim for downsizing to a two-tablespoon serving. You might also find some lighter dressings that you enjoy. 

9. Stick Butter or Margarine

If it can hold its shape in stick form, your butter or margarine is probably high in saturated fat. It's the saturated fat that makes fats more solid at room temperature. In years past, most margarine also contributed high amounts of unhealthy trans fat, though many have been reformulated.

It's easier to use more stick margarine or butter than you think because its firm texture makes it difficult to spread lightly on food. And each tablespoon will give you 100 calories and 11 grams of fat. Butter has 7 grams of saturated fat per tablespoon; stick margarines have 2 grams saturated fat and 1.5 to 2.5 grams trans fats per tablespoon.

Switching to canola oil or olive oil in your cooking and baking when possible is the best option because these oils are rich in mono- and polyunsaturated fat. But if you need a spreadable fat on the table or in a recipe, try a reduced-fat margarine in a tub with no trans fat and low amounts of saturated fat. If only butter will do, use whipped butter instead. It's easier to spread lightly and cuts the calories, fat, and saturated fat by a third.

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