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Focusing on the types of foods that you eat may boost performance.

A friend suggested I take ginseng after I complained about having trouble concentrating on a big project. She said it might help with my focus.

Another pal, who participated in a 24-hour relay race, says that Red Bull, marketed as an "energy drink," does the trick for him.

There are apparently many theories on focus-enhancing food and beverages. Edibles from caffeine to sugar to proteins are touted to help boost concentration.

Ubiquitous ads for dietary supplements add to the mix. Such products are supposed to improve memory, attention, and brain function.

With all these options offered, what's a person to do on the eve of an important affair? Can certain victuals help boost alertness for an exam, a job interview, or a presentation?

Many Food Options

Conversations with various experts reveal that there is both good and bad news. First, the reality is that there is no one magic food guaranteed to help people perform their best mentally and physically. The research on the connection between food and concentration is, for the most part, either lacking, or inconclusive. Some of the claims attached to certain foods are exaggerations of the truth, or downright false.

Now, for more the optimistic report: Certain fare may work for some people for a short-term, and studies are ongoing on the promising benefits of some nutrients on brain function.

Where does your favorite "food for thought" fit in?

Many everyday folk will swear by the virtues of caffeine and sugar in picking them up at opportune moments. Their tonic might be a stimulant such as coffee or tea, or a sweet such as ice cream or pastries, or a food rich in both such as chocolate, energy drinks such as Red Bull, and sodas.

Caffeine can energize the fatigued, but the benefit is short-lived, says Noralyn L. Wilson, RD, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association (ADA). She says individual characteristics determine the length of the effect and someone's reaction to it.

Some people will feel "up" with the accelerated heart rate caused by the stimulant, while others may feel jittery and uncomfortable.

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