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Why you need potassium -- and how much is too much, too little, or just right.

Potassium is a key player in good health, but you may not be getting enough from food. Here’s how potassium contributes to good health, and how to get the potassium you need.

Potassium is part of every cell in the body, and life would be impossible without it.

However, potassium is often taken for granted, in spite of its role in maintaining fluid balance, and keeping your brain, nerves, heart, and muscles functioning normally on a constant basis.

It’s important to eat enough potassium every day to feel your best, and to help prevent certain chronic conditions. Falling short on potassium on a regular basis could jeopardize your long-term health in more ways that one.

Potassium Protects the Heart, Brain, and More

“Potassium in the diet lowers blood pressure. High blood pressure is the major risk factor for stroke and heart disease,” says Lawrence Appel, MD, MPH, a professor of medicine, epidemiology, and international health at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.

Appel, who has studied the effects of diet on blood pressure, tells WebMD that potassium may curb elevated blood pressure by contributing to more flexible arteries, and by helping the body get rid of excess sodium. Sodium promotes fluid retention, which may result in higher blood pressure.

Potassium may bolster bone strength by helping guard against bone loss, and it helps to reduce the risk for kidney stones.

Potassium’s Partners in Better Blood Pressure

Potassium is important, but there’s more to lowering blood pressure than a single mineral.

“Diets that include foods rich in potassium are associated with lower blood pressure, but it’s not entirely accurate to give all the credit to potassium,” says Marla Heller, MS, RD.

Appel has researched the effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet on elevated blood pressure and found that it’s capable of lowering blood pressure, often in a matter of weeks.

Heller, author of The DASH Diet Action Plan, says the relatively low-sodium DASH diet is based on large amounts of fruits and vegetables, low-fat and nonfat dairy, beans, nuts, seeds, whole grains, and lean meats, fish, and poultry.

Although the DASH diet is a treasure trove of potassium, it’s also rich in calcium and magnesium, which help reduce blood pressure.

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