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    Acting Your Age

    Theater helps seniors.

    WebMD Feature
    Reviewed by Craig H. Kliger, MD

    July 17, 2000 -- When Nona Bingham of Portland, Ore., retired from her job as a supermarket clerk at age 65, she enrolled in oil painting and ceramic classes to keep busy. "But that didn't do it for me," says Bingham, a self-described workaholic.

    So she joined an acting group for senior citizens at a local community center and threw herself into rehearsals and tap dancing lessons. The group's first production, a variety show, drew an audience of four people. Now, 20 years later, her Northwest Senior Theatre troupe travels nationwide and draws audiences of 5,000 people.

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    "I got another life out of this," says Bingham, who now tap dances and performs comedy. At age 85, she's not quite the oldest in her troupe -- performers' ages range from 59 to 89.

    The Trend

    Senior theater groups are booming, with more than 200 in operation across the United States, and others starting up, says Bonnie Vorenberg, an expert in gerontology and theater in Portland, who has written a book, Senior Theatre Connections: The First Directory of Senior Theatre Performing Groups, Professionals, and Resources. The names of some of the groups hint at their underlying liveliness and sense of humor: Geritol Frolics, The Seasoned Performers, Extended Run Players.

    As people live longer, they're often looking for ways to add quality to their lives, says Vorenberg, who started the Northwest Senior Theatre group. "Creativity and the arts are where quality of life comes from," she says.

    The Productions

    Vorenberg has worked with a variety of elders, ranging from frail, confused nursing home patients to active seniors like Bingham. Although she says no studies have formally evaluated the benefits of senior theater, her informal surveys find that participants gain mentally, physically, and socially. Theater involvement "is better than a trip to the doctor," says Vorenberg. "You may not feel well before a performance, but you'll be high afterwards."

    Production formats run the gamut, from oral history to variety shows, from issue-oriented plays to intergenerational productions. Participants are as likely to exercise their brains as their legs, making new friends at the same time. Warming up, singing, dancing, and acting all work different muscles while they improve lung capacity. "I exercise more [on stage] than if I go to the gym," says Bingham. For the camera-shy, there are ample behind-the-scenes opportunities: lighting, prop, costume, or promotional work that demand the same interplay of physical activity, mental quickness, and social interaction.

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