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Other Treatments for AAT Deficiency

Drugs to help with breathing. For breathing problems, the treatments given for COPD can help. These may include inhaled drugs called bronchodilators that open up the airways. Steroids can reduce the swelling in the lungs.

Antibiotics. AAT deficiency makes it more likely that a simple cold can cause a lung infection. Your doctor may prescribe antibiotics to head off problems.

Vaccinations.  Protect yourself from dangerous infections that could make your symptoms worse. Get your flu, pneumococcal, and hepatitis shots.

Oxygen. Home and portable systems allow you to breathe extra oxygen.

Taking Charge of Your Health

Medical treatment isn't the only answer. There's a lot you can do on your own to improve your health. 

Make lifestyle changes. "If you have [AAT deficiency] and you smoke, quitting is the single most important change you need to make," Edelman says. Smoking can speed up the damage to your lungs. If you live with a smoker, do whatever you can to get them to stop. Limit exposure to dust, chemical fumes, and pollution, too.

Work with an expert. AAT deficiency often doesn't get diagnosed. "You might be your doctor's first case," Sandhaus says. "That happens pretty often." If you want a second opinion or different treatment options, look for an AAT deficiency expert.

Keep up-to-date. Treatment is changing. Sandhaus believes that within 5 years, you may be able to get augmentation therapy through an inhaler, instead of by IV. Studies of different drugs, gene therapy, and other cutting-edge techniques could change the course of the disease.

Speak up for yourself. If you have concerns about your medical care, share those with your doctor. If you think that you might have AAT deficiency, ask your doctor about that. You can discuss whether testing is a reasonable option, or whether something else might be causing your symptoms.  

Sandhaus has received funding for clinical studies from CSL Behring, AstraZeneca, Grifols, and Kamada.

is the cause of your copd genetic

Is the Cause of Your COPD Genetic?

Knowing if you have alpha-1 is the first step to getting help from your doctor. An alpha-1 blood test is the only way for you and your doctor to know whether you have alpha-1. And if you do, your doctor can discuss potential treatment options and testing for other family members.

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Important Safety Information

PROLASTIN®-C (alpha1-proteinase inhibitor [human]) is indicated for chronic augmentation and maintenance therapy in adults with clinically evident emphysema due to severe deficiency of alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency).

The effect of augmentation therapy with any alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI), including PROLASTIN-C, on pulmonary exacerbations and on the progression of emphysema in alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency has not been conclusively demonstrated in randomized, controlled clinical trials. Clinical data demonstrating the long-term effects of chronic augmentation or maintenance therapy with PROLASTIN-C are not available.

PROLASTIN-C is not indicated as therapy for lung disease in patients in whom severe alpha1-PI deficiency has not been established. PROLASTIN-C is contraindicated in IgA-deficient patients with antibodies against IgA due to risk of hypersensitivity.

Hypersensitivity reactions may occur. Should evidence of hypersensitivity reaction be observed, promptly stop infusion and begin appropriate therapy.

PROLASTIN-C may contain trace amounts of IgA. Patients with known antibodies to IgA, which can be present in patients with selective or severe IgA deficiency, have a greater risk of developing potentially severe hypersensitivity and anaphylactic reactions. PROLASTIN-C is contraindicated in patients with antibodies against IgA.

The most common drug-related adverse reaction observed at a rate of > 5% in subjects receiving PROLASTIN-C was upper respiratory tract infection. The most serious adverse reaction observed during clinical trials with PROLASTIN-C was an abdominal and extremity rash in 1 subject.

Because PROLASTIN-C is made from human plasma, it may carry a risk of transmitting infectious agents, eg, viruses and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent.

Please see PROLASTIN-C full Prescribing Information for complete prescribing details.