Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Menopause Health Center

Select An Article

Thyroid and Menopause: Confusing the Symptoms

    Font Size

    According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), millions of women with menopausal-like symptoms, even those taking estrogen, may be suffering from undiagnosed thyroid disease. While symptoms such as fatigue, depression, mood swings, and sleep disturbances are frequently associated with menopause, they may also be signs of hypothyroidism. A survey done by the AACE showed that only one in four women who have discussed menopause and its symptoms with a doctor were also tested for thyroid disease. The thyroid plays a role in regulating overall body metabolism and influences the heart, brain, kidney, and reproductive system, along with muscle strength and appetite.

    The case presented above illustrates how the symptoms of hypothyroidism can be attributed to menopause. While the issue of menopause needs to be addressed, it is also important to remember that the incidence of hypothyroidism increases with aging and can co-exist with other conditions.

    Recommended Related to Menopause

    Understanding Menopause -- the Basics

    Menopause simply means the end of menstruation for one year. As a woman ages, there is a gradual decline in the function of her ovaries and the production of estrogen. Around the time a woman turns 40, this process speeds up. This transition is known as perimenopause. Women typically menstruate for the last time at about 51 years of age. A few stop menstruating as young as 40, and a very small percentage as late as 60. Women who smoke tend to go through menopause a few years earlier than nonsmokers...

    Read the Understanding Menopause -- the Basics article > >

    As patients, you should be aware of the signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism and let your doctor know if you have concerns about your thyroid function. If you are a woman experiencing symptoms of menopause, do not hesitate to discuss them with your doctor. If you feel that the symptoms are persisting despite appropriate therapy, it may be worthwhile to have your TSH checked. A blood sample is all that is needed to make the initial diagnosis of hypothyroidism and treatment is easily achieved with thyroid replacement therapy.

    WebMD Medical Reference from MedicineNet

    Reviewed by Nivin Todd, MD on December 09, 2013
    Next Article:

    Today on WebMD

    woman walking outdoors
    How to handle headaches, night sweats, and more.
    mature woman holding fan in face
    Symptoms and treatments.
    woman hiding face behind hands
    11 ways to keep skin bright and healthy.
    Is it menopause or something else?
    senior couple
    mature woman shopping for produce
    Alcohol Disrupting Your Sleep
    mature couple on boat
    mature woman tugging on her loose skin
    senior woman wearing green hat
    estrogen gene

    WebMD Special Sections