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    Migraines Linked to Changes in Brain Structure

    MRI findings in study should not cause concern to patients, experts say

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Serena Gordon

    HealthDay Reporter

    WEDNESDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- People with migraines -- either with or without an aura preceding the headache -- show changes in the structure of their brains on imaging tests, researchers say.

    A new review of previous research shows that people who have migraines have abnormalities in the brain's white matter, lesions that resemble previous strokes, and changes in the volume of areas of their brains.

    "The clinical significance of these changes is unclear," said senior study author Dr. Messoud Ashina, an associate professor and director of the human migraine research program at the Danish Headache Center and Glostrup Hospital, in Copenhagen. "It is not clear how and why these lesions develop, what they are and what long-term consequences they have for individuals with migraine. Therefore, I do not think the patient should be concerned, but treatment and control of migraine is recommended," he added.

    Results of the study were published online Aug. 28 in the journal Neurology.

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder. It causes one-sided, throbbing headaches, according to study background information. These headaches may or may not be preceded by an aura, which is described as a visual disturbance, such as flashing lights or zigzag lines.

    The latest review of the research includes 19 studies on migraines. All of the studies included the use of MRI scans to identify changes in the brain.

    The review found that people who had migraines were more likely to have changes in their brains than were people who didn't have migraines. Those who had migraines with auras appeared to be more likely to have these changes than those who had migraines with no auras, but the association wasn't found to be statistically significant, according to Ashina.

    Only one study of those reviewed looked at the effect of treatment. This study found no changes to the brain as a result of anti-migraine therapy.

    Dr. Alon Mogilner, a neurosurgeon and director of the NYU Langone Center for Neuromodulation, in New York City, pointed out that "this study provides more proof that patients with migraines have brain abnormalities on MRIs. The question is: Is that why they have migraines, because of these abnormalities? Or, do they get migraines, and then these changes happen?" Mogilner said.

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