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Dental Health and Dentures

When Shouldn't Denture Adhesives Be Considered?

There are situations when denture adhesives should not be used. Those cases include:

  1. When it is used as a "fix" for ill-fitting or poorly constructed dentures. If dentures begin to feel loose, cause discomfort or cause sores to develop, contact your dentist as soon as possible.
  2. When a dentist has not evaluated dentures for a long time. Dentures rest on gum tissue and the jawbone, which shrink and deteriorate, respectively, over time. Therefore, the real problem might be a need for a denture adjustment or new dentures.
  3. When oral hygiene practices cannot be sustained.
  4. When adhesives have been used for a long time, especially when visits to the dentist are infrequent, and when the frequency and volume of the adhesive use increases. These developments may indicate the need for a denture adjustment or new dentures.
  5. When any known allergy exists to the adhesive's ingredients.

 

How Are Denture Adhesives Applied?

Here are some tips to consider when applying denture adhesives:

  • Use the minimum amount necessary to provide the maximum benefit. Apply less than you think you need, and then gradually increase the amount until you feel comfortable.
  • Distribute the adhesive evenly on the tissue bearing surface of the denture.
  • Apply or reapply when necessary to provide the desired effect.
  • Always apply the adhesive to a thoroughly clean denture.
  • Remember adhesives work best with a well-fitting denture.

 

What Are the Types of Denture Adhesives?

  1. Paste application. Apply this denture adhesive to a dry or preferably wet denture. Avoid placing adhesive close to the denture borders. If the adhesive oozes, use less of the product. For dentures on the upper jaw, apply three short strips of adhesive -- or a series of small dots -- along the ridge area and one down the center. For dentures on the lower jaw, apply three short strips of adhesive -- or a series of small dots -- in the center of the ridge area.
  2. Powder application. Sprinkle a thin, uniform layer throughout the tissue-bearing surface of the denture. Shake off excess powder and press the denture into place. Powders may be preferred over pastes because they are easier to clean off the denture and tissue. In addition, they don't have the same tendency as pastes do to "shim" (keep the denture away from the tissue).

Are Denture Adhesives Safe?

Dental adhesives are safe as long as they are used as directed. If the denture is well-fitting and the adhesive is only used to give added stability, there should be no ill effects. If adhesives are used excessively to fill voids for an ill-fitting denture, they can be harmful to the underlying soft and hard tissues. Occasionally, in these cases, inflammation of the soft tissues can result. In addition, because of its movement on the soft tissue and underlying bone, an ill-fitting denture can cause bone loss.

 

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Michael Friedman, DDS on May 22, 2014
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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

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American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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